Luddites


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Related to Luddites: Amish, Chartists, Fabians

Luddite

A term for workers in the early 19th century in Britain who opposed the Industrial Revolution because increased mechanization was changing the economy and leaving them without jobs. The term has come to mean any person who opposes technological changes, especially those that impact the economy.

Luddites

workers who destroyed labour-saving machinery in 19th-century England to try to prevent machines from taking over their jobs. Nowadays the term is used to describe anyone who resists technological development.
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It is true that in a general sense the Luddites were not successful either in the short-run aim of halting the detestable machinery or in the long-run task of stopping the Industrial Revolution and its multiple miseries; but that hardly matters in the retrospect of history, for what they are remembered for is that they resisted, not that they won.
The Luddite Awards, named after the Englishman Ned Ludd, who led a movement to destroy mechanized looms in the early 19th century, are given by the ITIF to those it perceives as worst offenders of the year when it comes to foiling technological progress.
You're a Luddite." We were both so pleased to get the right word that I didn't have the heart to argue.
The Luddites, and all unemployed people who were denied the opportunity to work, were widely abused as "feckless, lazy and idle", by those sections of the community that had reaped the benefits of modified technology, at the same time as they offered little assistance to retrain the dispossessed.
The sixth Annual Luddite Memorial Lecture will be held at the Bronte Lecture Theatre at the University of Huddersfield on Monday, April 29 (7.30pm), when admission is free.
But as he faced criticism from MPs of all parties, he stormed: "There is a Luddite tendency in this House which says we should have no technology.
"I believe the number of Luddites in the North-East and Borders, that is those that don't use IT and believe they don't need to, is linked to the unusually high number of small firms in the region.
For the Luddites among us, it is good to note that this hope isnot always delivered.
The lineup included such heavy hitters as Kirkpatrick Sale, author of Rebels Against the Future: The Luddites and Their War on the Industrial Revolution; Jeremy Rifkin, head of the Foundation on Economic Trends; Stephanie Mills, from the Great Lakes Bioregional Congress; Andrew Kimbrell, head of the International Center for Technological Assessment; and Vandana Shiva, head of Research Foundation for Science, Technology, and Natural Resource Policy.
Lenape Forge, Pennsylvania Although progressive critics like to invoke the memory of the Luddites to counter hightech communications hype, a number of labor unions are exploring inventive ways of using the internet for organizing.
Of those who don't use a computer personally, apart from the memorable "I don't compute--I think" and "Can't turn it on" replies already published, one respondent said, "Cannot see a need or benefit," while another admitted, "No previous need, but E-mail and EIS will force me to have one." Cheer up, you Luddites; your time will come.
THE Luddites are a perennial source of fascination, and now a new book is offering to take readers inside the mind of the most infamous Luddite of all - George Mellor.