Luddite


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Luddite

A term for workers in the early 19th century in Britain who opposed the Industrial Revolution because increased mechanization was changing the economy and leaving them without jobs. The term has come to mean any person who opposes technological changes, especially those that impact the economy.
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A story of wealthy bosses using technology as an excuse to beat down their workers - the legacy of the Luddites resonates stronger now than ever.
In contrast, the only thing the Luddites really did, despite their fervent attempt to ignore their changing world, was get their names into the dictionary.
Known as Luddites (named for Ned Lud, a deranged farmworker who began attacking machinery in the late 18th century), they were the forerunners to those who came to fear that they would be replaced by machines.
The band of Luddites, named for apprentice Ned Ludd, were fiercely opposed to changes taking place in the textiles industry that moved production from the homes of individual loom operators to factories where giant machines were staffed by shifts of workers.
And, when it comes to online auctions, more than a few foundrymen and suppliers think that the Luddites may have had the right idea.
In his 1984 essay "Is It OK to Be a Luddite?" Thomas Pynchon rejects the account of the Industrial Revolution in England as a rapid transformation brought about by specific technological innovations in the textile industry and instead accords with the accounts of Michel Foucault (210-11) and historians such as Jacques Ellul (43) and G.
However, it is important to remember the lesson of the Luddites.
Her quarrel with standard editions - the "unediting" of the title makes her out to be more of a Luddite than in fact she is - is that they bury historical evidence of textual variance in textual notes referenced to a single "established" text.
- Microsoft lead attorney John Warden said, "We firmly believe the Court will conclude after hearing all the evidence that this is not really an antitrust case, but a return of the Luddites - the 19th Century reactionaries who, fearful of competition, went around smashing machines with sledgehammers to arrest the march of progress driven by science and technology." When asked whether he was indeed a Luddite, chief prosecutor David Boies responded simply, "No." When asked again about the comparison, Boies said "I don't even know how to spell that."
In Rebels Against the Future, author Kirkpatrick Sale recounts the notorious Luddite uprising against industrialism and assesses its lessons for today.
And as I see it, there are seven lessons that one might, with the focused lens of history, take from the Luddite past.
The novel is set at the end of the Napoleonic Wars and during the period of the Luddite riots, when England's mill workers viewed the recent introduction of machinery as a threat to their livelihood and when the textile industry suffered almost total cessation of exports.