Low-Tech


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Low-Tech

1. Describing any technology in use prior to the Industrial Revolution.

2. Describing any technology that is no longer the latest available. For example, fax machines may be considered low-tech compared to e-mail. However, low-tech tools and technologies may still be usable and profitable. To continue the example, fax machines are still sold because they are still useful.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, the mainstream literature on innovation proposes the existence of a typical low-tech way to innovate, characterized by a "least noble" form to innovate, usually associated with dependence on third parties, predominance of incremental innovation, discontinuous process and low representativeness for the competitive strategies of these companies.
LOW-TECH AT TIP SHEETS: of the whole support system for individuals with learning disabilities to navigate hurdles within their learning community.
In short, low-tech solutions give us a lot of bang for our buck.
H1 In IPO firms, the Price Earnings Ratio (PER) to the High-Tech Industry's R&D expenses is larger than the PER to the Low-Tech Industry's R&D expenses.
One problem is the low-tech myth keeps young people (and their teachers) from considering a career in a smaller, creative manufacturing outfit.
It may be slower than using modern forestry machines, but there are clear benefits to the low-tech ways of working the land.
189), Lee resorted to low-tech methods and materials.
This paper compares two methods of conducting focus group meetings with stakeholders, a low-tech "Post-it" notes method used during 2003 and the use of Smartboard technology to help facilitate the process in 2004.
Many schools harbor such low-tech insurgents and pay too little attention to their potential for destruction.
In many ways, CA and PSYOP are the low-tech solutions to the low-tech problem, which is the biggest reason why they get so little attention among the military industrial complex, and thus in your magazine.
Securing Windows Server 2003 is devoted to fully understanding the system's options; from learning encryption and account password protection to using smart cards to make a system secure and derailing low-tech intrusions.
Colonel Hammes' focus here is upon '4GW': fourth generation warfare which is low-tech and surprisingly effective against high-tech enemies.