Low-Ball Offer

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Low-Ball Offer

An offer to buy something for an exceptionally low price. For example, if the asking price on a house is $200,000, a potential buyer may make a low-ball offer of $125,000.
References in periodicals archive ?
The company's mission is to eliminate useless haggling when selling privately or receiving low-ball offers from dealers and has been well received by customers.
The Brooklyn Park plant drew interest from buyers but only low-ball offers, Blaney said.
But shell-shocked residents made suspicious by scrounging adjusters and insurance companies pressing them with low-ball offers are left reeling.
DAVID BUSHBY Ron new laws have just been tabled in Parliament to restrict access to share registers in order to crack down on the use of these registers to make low-ball offers to buy shares from unsuspecting retail investors.
But one broker, speaking privately, echoes the views of many in the newspaper mergers-and-acquisitions world when he says the Times Co.--which paid $1.1 billion for the venerable Boston daily in 1993--was appalled at the low-ball offers. "I think the Times Co.
In many cases, they are holding onto underwater real estate loans not only because they don't want to accept low-ball offers, but also because they cannot afford the appearance of a large single-quarter loss, said real estate insiders.
Vultures are notorious for making low-ball offers for claims, knowing that sellers typically have little experience with bankruptcy, little knowledge of what their claims may be worth and no reliable way to research the market rate.
*Mini-tender hits Gannett: A Canadian investment firm that specializes in unsolicited mini-tenders -- low-ball offers that pray upon dim shareholders to buy less than five percent of a company's stock, thereby skirting Securities and Exchange Commission rules -- has come after Gannett Co.
They don't stand out and they attract low-ball offers that lower property values.”
"We've been getting a lot of low-ball offers, a lot of people looking to negotiate.
There is significant evidence that some computerized claim systems such as CSC's Colossus--have been used to systematically generate low-ball offers on claims.