Lot Line

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Lot Line

A line on a geographic survey denoting the boundary of a property. This is important in determining property ownership.
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For instance, chicken coops would have to be at least 10 feet away from lot lines, and couldn't be in front yards or street-facing side lots.
Contract awarded for In 2019, maintenance work such as road parking lot lines (unit price contract)
Planning Board Chairman Bill Hanley said that, at the end of the session, the board decided the applicant hadn't provided enough data relative to the measuring of sound levels at the lot lines. So, they asked them to provide more information about that, based upon the equipment they're using.
Tracini may not have had a lot lines but he was a constant source of amusement.
"And so we just decided the whole zoning thing was an absolute waste of time, and if you ever took a drawing of it, what they want is the lot lines to go into the water.
The property lot lines are generally bordered by fences and tree lines.
No county staff had visited the site to inspect and enforce the drainage plans of the two developers, and no one in the county's public works or planning departments had picked up on the fact that lot lines from the two back-to-back developments did not match up.
Coldwell Banker Bali Hai Realty of Hanalei, Hawaii, has launched a new web site integrating pricing, lot lines and video technology into Google satellite mapping.
For operation between buildings with narrow lot lines, Case also offers a 90-inch blade for more precise work.
Although those properties would remain residential, the lot lines would change, making more room for the pharmacy.
The court then held that because FAS owned both shores of the stream, FAS held title to the entire streambed, making the parcel one continuous lot Next, the court noted that the zoning ordinances define a lot's area as the area "contiguous, not separated by public roadway, of a lot between its front, rear, and side lot lines" Because the definition expressly excludes public roads but does not mention navigable tributaries, the court held that the Johnson Creek streambed should be included in the area of FAS's lot and likewise in the lot's lakeshore frontage.
"There's a drainage channel that has to be worked around, and we're talking about adjusting the lot lines between our properties" to make better design sense.