Carryback

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Carryback

Carryback

In accounting, a way for a company to reduce its tax liability by applying a net operating loss to previous years in which it made a profit. If a company deducts more than its net income in a given tax year, it may take the difference between the deduction and the net income (a negative number) and apply it as a deduction on taxable income for the previous five years. For example, if a company makes $1,000,000 in one year, and loses $500,000 the following year, it may only be liable for a $500,000 profit on the year it makes a profit. That is, it may receive a tax refund on part of what it paid for the profitable year. See also: Future Income Tax.

carryback

A business operating loss that, for tax purposes, may be deducted for a certain number of prior years, usually no more than three. A business uses a carryback to recover taxes paid on income earned in prior years. For example, if a firm experiences a year of large losses following a period of profitable operations, it may use the losses to cancel out profits from preceding years on which taxes have been paid. When the taxes a company paid on profits are canceled because of a carryback, the firm is issued a refund by the Internal Revenue Service. Also called carryover, tax loss carryback.
References in periodicals archive ?
This article will focus on tax strategies to employ, taxable income computations, deductible expenses, capital gains and losses, operating loss carry-backs and carry forwards, pension plans, tax credits, administrative matters and S corporations.
Generally speaking, gross tax assets shall be admitted in an amount equal to the sum of (1) federal income taxes paid in prior years that can be recovered through loss carry-backs for existing temporary differences that reverse by the end of the subsequent calendar year; (2) the lesser of (a) the amount of gross deferred tax assets expected to be realized within one year of the balance sheet date, or (b) 10% of statutory capital and surplus as required to be shown on the statutory balance sheet of the entity for its most recently filed statement.
170(b)(2), is that the deduction for any tax year is limited to 10% of taxable income determined without regard to charitable contributions, special deductions (dividends received deduction, etc.) and net operating and capital loss carry-backs. Charitable contributions in any year are available as a carry-forward to the five successive taxable years.