Lorenz curve

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Lorenz Curve

A graph showing what percentage of a population possesses a certain percentage of a thing. For example, a Lorenz curve may show that the top five percent of the people in a country control 40% of the wealth. While it may be used in ecology as well as some other fields, it is frequently used in economics to represent social inequality. It was developed in 1905.

Lorenz curve

see CONCENTRATION MEASURES.
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NOTE: This figure plots Lorenz curves for the hourly-wage distribution ("Cross-sectional"), the wage distribution assuming everyone with the same occupation earns the same wage ("Hourly Wage (pooled)"), and the distribution of the PDV at 25 by occupation group ("PDV (age-specific)").
In addition, inequality can be made visible by means of Lorenz curves that show what percentage of total EC is held by the bottom x% of countries.
Based on the score the data obtained was used to calculate Sorenson's similarity coefficient, Shannon's diversity index (11), Range weighted richness (12), Pielou's evenness index (13), Pareto Lorenz curve (14) and Moving window analysis (15).
Related parametric measures of income inequality like Gini index, generalized entropy measure, two percentile ratios and Lorenz curve illustrate that income inequality is increased in the province of Punjab during the years 2004-2008.
One could use classic Lorenz curves to compare a premium to a loss distribution.
Jiang, "Changes ofland use structure in Beijing mountain area based on spatial Lorenz curves," Journal of China Agricultural University, vol.
The general Lorenz curve shown in Figure 1 plots the cumulative share of the number of individuals by income (from smallest to largest incomes) (on the x-axis) and the cumulative share of income (on the y-axis).
Figure 2 gives the Lorenz curve for low-wage densities at the $12 per hour low-wage threshold.
Let [F.sub.X] (x) be the distribution function of a non-negative random variable X with finite mean [[mu].sub.x], then the Lorenz curve, also called curve of concentration, corresponding to X can be defined (Gastwirth, 1971) as:
Ahmed and Ludlow (1989) estimated problem of inequality by using Coefficient of Variation, Logarithmic Variance, Gini-Coefficient, Atkinson Indices and the Lorenz Curves for 1979 and 1984-85.
This includes a study of the pattern of these KAS using Hoover index and Lorenz curves. These indices and curves determine that whether the distribution of population with respect to area in the Katchi abadi (KA) under consideration is uniform or not.
The index is based on the Lorenz curve. Figure A-1 displays the Lorenz curves for the seven tax provisions making up the Bush tax cuts that are considered in this study.