Lorenz curve

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Lorenz Curve

A graph showing what percentage of a population possesses a certain percentage of a thing. For example, a Lorenz curve may show that the top five percent of the people in a country control 40% of the wealth. While it may be used in ecology as well as some other fields, it is frequently used in economics to represent social inequality. It was developed in 1905.

Lorenz curve

see CONCENTRATION MEASURES.
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Based on the score the data obtained was used to calculate Sorenson's similarity coefficient, Shannon's diversity index (11), Range weighted richness (12), Pielou's evenness index (13), Pareto Lorenz curve (14) and Moving window analysis (15).
The comparative visual and graphical display of empirical and parametric Lorenz curves of all the considered distribution models for both of our data sets is provided.
One could use classic Lorenz curves to compare a premium to a loss distribution.
5 (the axes scale from 0 to 1), G=2A so that the Gini coefficient is determined by A: Lorenz curves further from the equality diagonal (larger A) imply higher G values and thus greater income inequality, and Lorenz curves closer to the equality diagonal (smaller A ) indicate lower Ginis.
Figure 2 gives the Lorenz curve for low-wage densities at the $12 per hour low-wage threshold.
x], then the Lorenz curve, also called curve of concentration, corresponding to X can be defined (Gastwirth, 1971) as:
Ahmed and Ludlow (1989) estimated problem of inequality by using Coefficient of Variation, Logarithmic Variance, Gini-Coefficient, Atkinson Indices and the Lorenz Curves for 1979 and 1984-85.
In section 2 we will study the distribution of population with respect to area in these KAS using Hoover index and Lorenz curves.
Let the area under the Lorenz curve be denoted as L--it is the area bounded from below by the horizontal axis and from above by the Lorenz curve.
Lorenz curves may be constructed from grouped data using interpolation techniques or may be presumed to follow a particular parametric form and fit to tabulated data.
Service-sector Lorenz curves are located in Panels A and C of Figure 7.
For Elliptical Lorenz curves these conditions are equivalent to [alpha]< 0, e < 0, d [greater than or equal to] 0 and a + d [less than or equal to] 1 (Villasenor and Arnold,1989).