Loonie


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Loonie

Informal for the Canadian dollar. The term comes from the picture of the common loon, a Canadian bird, on the reverse of the one-dollar coin. The nickname originated in 1987 with the introduction of this coin. See also: Greenback.
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This would exacerbate the competitive challenge alluded to in the previous paragraph both in its own right and because the then-existing high demand for labour in Canada was increasing wage rates, the negative competitive impact of which would also be heightened by an appreciating loonie.
Ottawa, unlike Tokyo, London, Washington, Prague, Canberra and Berne, will not talk the loonie lower even though Mark Carney has migrated to Threadneedle Street.
dollar being overvalued, as it is a measure of weakness in the loonie.
Perhaps it's the superstition of a bingo player, the same way many have lucky objects placed near their cards when they play, or maybe they don't want the rest of the world to know about their little treasure, but whatever the reason, the people of Norway House are tight-lipped about their loonie landmark.
How does a Canadian loonie communicate belief in the integrity and rights of a separate Quebec?
Global investors are now also net sellers of Canadian equities (energy/commodities bear markets) and unhedged Canadian Eurobonds and no Chinese mega-acquirers of Alberta tar sands titans will anchor the loonie.
Another hurdle is that both the public and the government are not well-versed on the different kinds of illegal drugs, Loonie points out.
The shock bank of canada rate cut has hit the loonie hard.
The loonie averaged 91 cents to the American dollar in January, according to the monthly average exchange rate at market close, calculated by the Bank of Canada.
Despite the bearish loonie data the USD/CAD saw very little reaction.
The company says it represents a good news story for the beleaguered lumber in dustry, which has been hit hard by the cross-border softwood lumber dispute, skyrocketing energy and insurance bills and a loonie that at Northern Ontario Business deadline was hovering around 85 cents against the greenback.