Longshoreman


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Longshoreman

A person who loads and unloads cargo from ships. Because these jobs are often both temporary and dangerous, longshoremen in the United States are entitled to coverage under the Longshore Act. A longshoreman is also called a docker or a stevedore.
References in periodicals archive ?
9 shed, AR hurt his back again: "A sling of lumber hit him a glancing blow." Not surprisingly, AR'S body was covered with bumps and bruises, and gouges from his longshoreman's hook.
These jobs are not inherently less dignified and compelling than the old forms of industrial labor--at least as far as I can see--but their occupants have been pounded into a level of servility that would appall a self-respecting longshoreman. The unions have been beaten back with the help of a $2 billion a year union-busting industry.
After his father died in 1920, he went west to California, living a rough-and-tumble existence until finally settling into the relative stability of work as a San Francisco longshoreman in 1942.
Even when the dangerous condition was brought into play by the stevedore, the longshoreman's employer, the vessel still was liable for unseaworthiness.(5) At the same time, however, courts allowed the vessel in most cases to recover its damages from the stevedore for breaching its duty of workmanlike performance.(6)
But the acting is first-rate, especially -- in addition to the remarkable McGrath -- John Spencer as Floyd, the abusive longshoreman with more than a touch of Jimmy Cagney, and Deborah Hedwall, as Chris's divorced, suffocating mother.
Hoffer, a longshoreman who wrote articles, books, and aphorisms in his spare time, was a self - taught philosopher whose style was strongly influenced by Montaigne.
The first thing that he discovered is that in refusing to work these longshoremen were partly protesting the dissolution of their traditional work relations, especially the declining importance of the gang structure, which had formed the central element in the longshoreman's work activity.
155 students got the profession of a longshoreman (slingsman) by 78% more than in the previous year.
Thus, San Pedro longshoreman Al Langley recalled that "after the ['34] strike there wasn't a job in the world to equal longshoring, although it was hard, hard work." Thousands of miles to the North, in the port of Seattle, Jerry Tyler declared, "I guess I was one of the luckiest guys that ever pulled on a pair of pants when I joined the ILWU." Now, as a pensioner, Tyler affirms that "every time I go to the hospital, or up to the clinic, or have to get some medicine, I think, 'Thank God for Harry Bridges and the ILWU.'" (125) Charles (Brother) Hackett worked in a San Francisco warehouse in the 1930s.
Where in the human body are the Eustachian longshoreman? tubes?