Long-Term Care


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Long-Term Care

Long-term medical care for a debilitating but non-life threatening condition. For example, one may require long-term care if one is involved in a car accident or has a non-terminal disease that does not allow him/her to live independently. Long-term care often involves the inability to perform at least some of the activities of daily living. One may purchase long-term care insurance to pay for some of the expenses associated with long-term care.
References in periodicals archive ?
The changes that are taking place in long-term care can be viewed either as challenging and disruptive or as an opportunity to develop innovative ways of thinking about long-term care and create new products and services for it.
The end buyer of group insurance is younger, at an average age of 43, than the buyer of individual insurance, whose average age is 66 (Health Insurance Association of America Research Findings, "Long-Term Care Insurance in 1997-1998," March 2000,) While individual buyers are retired people and those on the verge of retirement, group insurance buyers are working people.
Federal programs for long-term care have mainly funded institutions, whereas com munity- and family-based care is more desirable because it better addresses needs.
It already connects all the state's hospitals, 95% of its physicians, all its labs and psychiatric hospitals, and long-term care for claims purposes, notes Jan Root, PhD, UHIN's director.
Long-term care is emerging as a substantial focus of national attention.
How has the industry changed, and what is the future of long-term care?
Another issue that many long-term care professionals encounter that leads to ethical problems happens when a resident is viewed as having dementia; no matter how minimal or extensive the disease, the person is frequently placed within a single category: totally incompetent to assist with and make any in formed decisions.
With the "LTC Choice" plan in place, most Americans will insure for the risk of long-term care to avoid putting their estates at risk.
While consumers need to take some personal responsibility for planning to meet their own long-term care needs, policy makers and elected officials share in the responsibility to make sure assisted living remains affordable.
This long-debated issue that cuts across all of healthcare has been described as all but politically dead for long-term care this year.
By contrast, the Federal Employees Group Long-term Care Insurance Act of 1999 (HR 110), introduced by Representative Elijah E.
Ever get the feeling that you've been spinning your wheels professionally, that your career has bogged down in today's long-term care woes of red tape, regulation, and wretched reimbursement?

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