Long-Term Unemployment


Also found in: Acronyms.

Long-Term Unemployment

The lack of work for an extended period of time, often defined as six months or longer. Long-term unemployment can be extremely harmful to the unemployed person because he/she may lose eligibility for certain government benefits if he/she has been out of work for too long. Likewise, significant long-term unemployment can create a vicious cycle for the economy at large: the skill set of the long-term unemployed workers may languish or even become obsolete in some industries, which makes it more difficult for them to find work when employers begin to hire again.
References in periodicals archive ?
Help for troubled families could prevent scenes like these and lead to improved long-term unemployment figures, says the Cabinet member for young people Clr Cath Harris, below
Analysis of the most recent data for the UK suggests there has been a modest rise in long-term unemployment to date.
While the less-educated population, total unemployment, long-term unemployment and number of police officers increased the crime rate, the more-educated population, expenditures of police departments and the clear-up rate lowered the crime rate.
Fewer people may be recorded as being in long-term unemployment because they are in higher education
Europe needs far more innovative labor-market policies to spur job creation and reduce long-term unemployment, which can be particularly destabilizing for society.
A new study shows long-term unemployment has reached alarming levels, especially among college graduates and women.
That translates to one in every 72 working-age people in the city facing long-term unemployment - the highest rate in England, and four times the national average.
(4) Long-term unemployment not only may affect finances negatively, it may also adversely affect the physical and mental health of the unemployed and negatively affect their children's schooling outcomes.
Especially in countries that experienced sovereign debt crises like Greece, Spain and Portugal, long-term unemployment affects the majority of jobseekers.
Why does long-term unemployment have such an adverse effect on workers?
There is a strong correlation between long-term unemployment and food pantry use in New York state, according to a study published in the March issue of APHA's American Journal of Public Health.
The dramatic rise in long-term unemployment has been one of the most striking features of the Great Recession of 2007-09.