Long-Term Moving Average

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Long-Term Moving Average

The average price of a security over several weeks or months, calculated continuously. For instance, one may calculate a long-term moving average by adding the closing prices from each day for the past 52 weeks and dividing by the number of trading days considered. As with all moving averages, long-term moving averages may or may not be weighted. Moving averages help smooth out noise that may be present in a security's price on a given trading day. See also: Simple Moving Average, Exponential Moving Average.
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We advise to stay light on positions or accumulate issues which are still holding above long-term moving averages, he said.
However, the major trend is up as the markets are currently trading above their short-term, medium-term and long-term moving averages.
However, he noted, the longer-term trend of the currency remains bearish as the prices remain under declining long-term moving averages.
1992), especially when the short-term and long-term moving averages are very close to each other.
Cook and Levin also looked at key long-term moving averages on the upside that may either attract bulls or repel bears.
A cautious position is still raised this week, especially since some issues have already recovered above their long-term moving averages.
WMB has not suffered a monthly close below both of these long-term moving averages since February 2003.
The stock is now trading below its major short-, intermediate-, and long-term moving averages, a negative sign from a technical perspective.
The shares are currently trading below their intermediate and long-term moving averages, a negative sign from a technical perspective.
The security is currently trading below its intermediate- and long-term moving averages, a negative sign from a technical perspective.
Today's positive earnings surprise has pushed the equity above its major short-, intermediate-, and long-term moving averages.
However, the adverse reaction to earnings has sent the shares below all short-, intermediate-, and long-term moving averages, a negative sign from a technical perspective.

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