Long-Term Forward Contract

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Long-Term Forward Contract

A non-standardized, over-the-counter agreement in which one party agrees to buy a certain asset from the other at a certain price, at a certain time more than one year in the future. Because there is little secondary market for any forward contract, long-term forward contracts are zero-sum games; one party will win and the other will lose.
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The Ibrox manager reckons he is simply not in the position to contemplate long-term forward planning for Premiership life ahead of the fight in store in next term's Championship.
In response," he said, "the international brewing industry placed long-term forward contracts on the assumption that beer output would continue to rise.
One of the broader conclusions that can be drawn from this study is that persistent long-term forward contamination is unlikely as long as bacterial cells are deposited in the upper 2 cm of the Martian surface dust.
The fact that the company is tied into long-term forward contracts with customers overseas, and for its materials, helps amid the current financial turmoil.
The basic strategy calls for entering into long-term forward contracts for physical delivery with big grain suppliers such as Minneapolis-based Cargill Inc.
Sure, SAA would not have locked in the predictability of exchange rates for as long, but it would have mitigated the potential accounting impact of marking-to-market such long-term forward contracts.
This comparison lets us easily consider to what extent the recent behavior of long-term forward rates represents an unusual experience or not.
The more modest decline in the ten-year yield is essentially an average of the sharp decline in long-term forward rates and the concurrent increase in short-term rates.
Similarly, the long-term forward rate is the sum of the long-term real interest rate and long-term inflation expectations.
As its sole financial risk-management strategy, Newmont hedged gold using long-term forward pricing, but the company did not use the same strategy for copper.
Moreover, declines in spot and near-term oil futures and forward prices significantly exceeded declines in long-term forward prices.
Reportedly, the company thought it had hedged its long-term forward contracts to supply American customers with petroleum products at fixed prices by entering into near-term futures contracts to purchase oil.

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