Long-Term Care


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Long-Term Care

Long-term medical care for a debilitating but non-life threatening condition. For example, one may require long-term care if one is involved in a car accident or has a non-terminal disease that does not allow him/her to live independently. Long-term care often involves the inability to perform at least some of the activities of daily living. One may purchase long-term care insurance to pay for some of the expenses associated with long-term care.
References in periodicals archive ?
Grachek: One of College Chairman Larry Slatky's goals is closer collaboration with the trade and professional associations in long-term care.
The Ontario Nurses' Association says new legislation is missing key elements that are essential to safer long-term care environments: minimum staffing standards, improved working conditions and adequate transparency and accountability regarding how public funds are being spent.
About 40% of the nation's functionally disabled people who need long-term care are between the ages of 18 and 64.
The cost of their care is covered by programs such as Medicaid, Medicare, private health or long-term care insurance or "self financing" by patients.
Wrong,'' said Ron Barkley, a Los Angeles elder law attorney who specializes in navigating long-term care financing.
PharMetica offers long-term care facilities a comprehensive pharmacy strategy that is client-oriented and full-service.
More people receive Medicaid long-term care services in the community, but the lion's share of spending is on expensive, institutional services.
213 (d) (11), qualified long-term care services do not include services provided to an individual by:
Federal programs for long-term care have mainly funded institutions, whereas com munity- and family-based care is more desirable because it better addresses needs.
We developed our programs around our belief that only advisors who understand the continuum of long-term care, disability and associated financial issues can serve the best interests of their clients," explains CareQuest University President, Bob Pearson.
The most long-term care policy-oriented possibility--and it was a worrisome one--affected rehabilitation services.
Also, the person in need of long-term care will see his or her lifetime savings quickly disappear, spent on medical necessities.

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