Long-Range Budget

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Long-Range Budget

A budget with a term usually longer than one year. A long-range budget involves more uncertainty than a short-term budget because, typically, market movements and the business cycle are more easily predictable in the short term. On the other hand, planning for the long-term is necessary in order to ensure sustainable profitability. Thus, while planning for the long term is necessary, one's plan must be flexible to account for the uncertainty inherent to it.
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Commissioner Oettinger travels to the Netherlands to discuss EU's next long-term budget
The Polish-Lithuanian consultations, which were held on Tuesday in Vilnius, focused on the new term of the European Commission, negotiations on a new long-term budget and climate neutrality.
Capital expenditures required to minimize lost water to leaks within the village water system is another potential long-term budget issue.
In May 2018, the European Commission presented proposals for an ambitious new Erasmus programme, seeking to double the budget to 30 billion euro (USD 34 billion) in the EU's next long-term budget for the period 2021-2027.
A measure of the difficulty was an earlier statement by European Budget Commissioner Gnther Oettinger, who tried to sound optimistic as he said he sees a "50-50" chance of the EU reaching a long-term budget deal before European Parliament elections next May.
(Congressional Budget Office2018 Long-Term Budget Outlook)
But consensus on long-term budget issues remains elusive there as well.
Britain's departure will also leave a big hole in the bloc's next, long-term budget and the European Commission's Wednesday proposal will now be discussed by all the remaining 27 EU states and the European Parliament.
Britain could also end up tied to new EU spending programmes such as the Common Agricultural Policy without having a say over how they are designed or spent once Brussels' new long-term budget comes into effect on January 1, 2021.
A lack of a stable, long-term budget from the federal government also could ground the work they do there.
Fergus Laird, head of investment at Naylors, said: "Our client had a specific requirement for a long-term budget hotel investment.
Pointing to the need to appropriately support current combat operations and to maintain a technological advantage over sophisticated potential adversaries, NDIA is asking for long-term budget stability to provide our military with "adequate and stable funding that ensures the ability to respond to contingencies now and prepare for those that may lie in our future " as its first priority.
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