Long-Term Bond

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Long-Term Bond

A debt security with a maturity in the long-term. While there is no set definition of what constitutes the long-term, it is generally accepted that long-term bonds are those that mature several years in the future, often more than 15 or 20. One of the most low-risk long-term bonds, the U.S. Treasury Bond, usually has a maturity of 30 years.
References in periodicals archive ?
Global Banking News-January 15, 2018--State Bank of India announces capital raising for affordable housing through long-term bonds
The additional issuance of bonds in the ultra-long sector is in keeping with the commitment that the Government made in Budget 2017 to reallocate short-term issuance towards long-term bonds in order to lock in low funding costs and reduce refinancing risk.
It'sobvious that long-term bonds have higher risks as it's harder to predict the forthcoming of the market.
Tuesday, Government took another loan from the domestic creditors with long-term deadlines, from 10 to 15 years, and from the Ministry of Finance explained that these long-term bonds are mainly issued on the request of the pension funds.
Yet as rates rise, investors will see the market value of their long-term bonds drop sharply.
My warning about losses from holding or investing additional funds in bonds may have been a bit early, but investors this year have lost money, in long-term bonds and bond funds.
Italy : Italy's borrowing costs were down on Wednesday in a sale of medium- and long-term bonds that raised 6.
5 billion in medium and long-term bonds at lower rates: Italy borrowed 6.
In addition, Uni-President Enterprises and Taiwan Power have rushed to issue corporate bonds recently, as they believe domestic interest rates are unlikely to drop further and issuance of long-term bonds at present can save long-term funding cost.
Noting that the bank had repaid $500 million in debt in March 2011, he added that 85 per cent of short-term bond holders have agreed to swap into long-term bonds.
While the short-term market is relatively unscathed, long-term bonds which typically pay the higher rates have been hit hard.