lobbying

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Lobbying

The business, act, or practice of attempting to influence legislation or policy. For example, a lobbyist may call a legislator and urge him/her to vote for a bill that, if passed, would favor the industry or interests of lobbyist's client. Lobbying can be a lucrative business. However, a variety of rules exist in many jurisdictions to guard against the possibility that it can degenerate into bribery.

lobbying

the process of bringing pressure to bear on governments to persuade them to adopt policies or allocate resources in ways that are favourable to special-interest groups, for example, farmers pressuring their agricultural ministers for higher agricultural support prices and environmental groups pressing for tougher pollution controls.
References in periodicals archive ?
Roque alleged that the Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International are some "lobby groups" and the Open Society Institute (OSI) founded by business magnate George Soros as alleged funder of human rights groups.
(15.) Findlay and Wellisz (1982, 1983) develop a model where the action of two opposing lobby groups determine commercial policy, but the free rider problem is assumed away.
There have been one or two private member's bills in 18 months in the UK," says Conor Ward, a partner in London-based law firm Lovell White Durrant, "but they were all no-hopers." The influence of lobby groups has been critical, Ward argues.
Ceteris paribus, when output contracts in the polluting sector following trade liberalization, both lobby groups reduce their lobbying on the tax issue in the new equilibrium because the marginal return to a change in the tax decreases.(3) Thus, this paper contributes to the literature on "ecological dumping," which discusses the government's incentive to set environmental regulations such that marginal abatement costs deviate from the marginal damage from pollution.
Some lobby groups such as Canadians for Gun Control, for example, said the new rules could be used by politicians who favour the gun lobby.
More than 40 lobby groups under the National Human Rights Institutions have resolved to support investigative agencies in the war on graft in African nations.
Roque named the Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International as some lobby groups and the Open Society Institute (OSI) funding human rights groups.
Renowned civil society activists are blackmailing the Mombasa County government with the latest Auditor-General's report on usage of funds, officials claimed on Monday.County communication director Richard Chacha said some lobby groups in Mombasa and Nairobi were soliciting for bribes from the county following the report in which the administration has been cited over inaccuracies in financial records.
The company is under pressure to explain how it reached its decision amid concerns from lobby groups about the influence of a father-and-son partnership at its helm.
I also wonder if the bishops will see the need to reconsider and take seriously parents' anguished criticisms of the Canadian Catechism, which has left Canadian Catholics under 40 years of age completely bereft of any Catholic formation, and thus easy prey for politicians and lobby groups who wish to assail the traditional Christian family.
The EU's main agricultural lobby groups have launched a defence of Italian traditional food producers in the current European debate on registered designations of origin.
Mr Frost said he did not believe British businesses had 'three too many' lobby groups.