Inter-Vivos Trust

(redirected from Living Trusts)

Inter-Vivos Trust

A trust into which the grantor deposits certain assets for the management by another party while the grantor is still living. That is, the inter-vivos trust is created and maintained before the grantor dies. Generally speaking, an inter-vivos trust exists to help avoid estate taxes after death and other taxes while still living. One may also set up an inter-vivos trust to facilitate long-term property management. It is also called a living trust.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rubin Law will discuss special needs trusts, necessary special provisions in wills, revocable living trusts, irrevocable life insurance trusts, powers of attorney short-term guardian declarations, standby guardian declarations, and necessary changes to beneficiary designations for life insurance, IRA, 401(k), pension or profit-sharing plans.
--Has the parent signed relevant documents (e.g., powers of attorney, living trusts, healthcare proxy)?
Synopsis: Now in a fully updated seventh edition that includes all of the 2016 tax law changes, "Understanding Living Trusts" is an essential do-it-yourself guide for individuals and families with all size estates.
For credit unions, the shift toward defined contribution plans such as 401(k) s and 403(b)s opens up an opportunity to meet the needs of boomers through living trusts and related services.
Client couples who are considering establishing a living trust should know what their options are, and to those with existing shared living trusts may also appreciate hearing about the benefits of a shared trust.
Therefore, revocable trusts may be called "living trusts," and they have become increasingly popular.
Attorney Guthrie spoke about the fundamentals of wills, probate court, living trusts, power of attorney, and getting everything organized.
Living trusts are established by a person called the grantor or settler and take effect during that person's life.
"Living Trusts for Everyone: Why a Will is not the Way to Avoid Probate, Protect Heirs, and Settle Estates" is a discussion of wills and trusts, as author Ronald Farrington Sharp hopes to enlighten readers on the dangers of a will and what many people do not understand about them.
Living trusts are powerful estate planning tools that can help many people.
The Powers family purchased it for $340,000 in June 2002 from Richard and Patricia Elimon's namesake revocable living trusts.