listing broker

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Listing broker

In the context of equity, when a stock is traded in exchange it is said to be listed. A licensed real estate broker who completes a listing of a property for sale.

Listing Broker

In equities, the broker who puts a security up for trade on an exchange, also called listing the security. The broker must be a registered member of the exchange in question, and the security must meet the exchange's listing requirements.

listing broker

The real estate broker who enters into an agreement with a property owner to market and solicit offers to buy the owner's property.

References in periodicals archive ?
Since enlisting Localmize as their SEO partner, WS Ponton is now found on the first page for many of its targeted keywords allowing potential customers to find the marketing data provider online for its premium list broker services, premium mailing lists, and exclusive email lists.
They have been providing list brokers with mailing lists even before the term “list broker” was coined.
When a nonprofit is trying to negotiate the best savings on printing, they usually aren't discussing this with their list broker. Yet, your list broker can be a direct conduit to the strategies, techniques, and professionals that ultimately reduce your printing costs.
You've already tasked your list broker to "mail smarter." You are mailing less.
A list broker, like a travel agent, has a specialized knowledge of lists.
For example, a list broker might double the base price but allow you to use the list three times.
Thus, the two principal players are the marketer (who figures out the offer and creates the want) and the list broker (who finds the prospects).
Today, as 50 years ago, every marketer and every list broker has access to every list.
If The Direct Marketing Association compelled the member list brokers to force anyone who rented a list through the member list broker to comply with the guidelines and procedures set by The Direct Marketing Association with regard to the mail preference and telephone preference service, a major step would be taken in self regulations because The Direct Marketing Association then would be involved directly in regulating another major segment of the industry.
Protect yourself from weak, imprecise or downright incorrect or out-of-date information on data cards by asking lots of questions of your list broker, the manager of the list or any other resource you have available.
For example, consider how a publisher might work with a list broker to find prospective subscribers to a new magazine, says Harwin, noting his current work for Vibe, a new magazine covering music and popular culture.
If, in fact, the Internet has presented list brokers and managers with a "second-half" challenge, then how about responding with a progressive posture that embraces this powerful tool to our advantage.