Performance

(redirected from Linguistic performance)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Linguistic performance: Linguistic competence, descriptive grammar

Performance

1. The total return on an investment over a period of time.

2. A subjective measure of how an investment or the market generally is doing over a period of time.

3. In contracts, substantial completion of an agreed-upon task. That is, a party to a contract performs the contract when he has more-or-less completed what he has agreed to do, with no or only minor work left to do.

Performance.

Performance, expressed as a percentage, measures the total return an investment provides over a specific period. It can be positive, representing a gain in value, or negative, representing a loss.

While return is reported on a second-to-second and day-to-day basis, short-term results are less significant an indicator of strength or weakness than performance over longer periods, such as one, five, or ten years.

Past performance is one of the factors you can use to evaluate a specific investment, but there's no guarantee that those results will be repeated in the future. What past performance can tell you is the way the investment has previously reacted to fluctuations in the markets, and, in the case of managed funds, something about the skills of the manager.

An investment is said to outperform when its return is stronger than the return of its benchmark or peers over the same period. Conversely, it is said to underperform if its results lag those of its benchmark or peer.

performance

In contracts, the substantial completion of all duties and responsibilities. Note: The exact meaning of the word “substantial” is the cause of much litigation in contract law.
References in periodicals archive ?
In doing so, she constructs the belongingness of her child to the Wanano descent group and recognizes the necessity of manifesting that belonging in linguistic performance.
* The academic competence of the Nigerian postgraduate students specializing in English with language emphasis does not reflect in their linguistic performance in English intonation tune assignment.
"Accuracy categories" like "Pronunciation" and "Grammar and Vocabulary" look at particular aspects of linguistic performance and their descriptors can be usually assessed as "right" or "wrong".
Teachers' roles and responsibilities often include, for instance, planning assessment activities, collecting samples of student work, and interpreting and making judgements about students' linguistic performances; monitoring, adapting, and modifying assessment depending on teaching and learning goals; and giving immediate and constructive feedback to students (Davison & Leung, 2009).
Using their own observational evidence as well as students' performance on learning tasks that were already a part of their instructional repertoire, experienced teachers who participated in the study reported that they were able to elicit sufficient evidence of students' linguistic performances to make judgements about students' proficiency level.
Teachers reported that their use of the STEP assessment tool involved gathering evidence of students' linguistic performances within the context of everyday curriculum learning activities.
It is bold and imaginative in its articulation of the political work possible through testimonio without sacrificing precise attention to the interpretive possibilities of linguistic performances that have become a hallmark of Cruz-Malave's work.
Against many language theorists, who think of a public language in terms of an ahistorical abstract system of symbol-types governed by discrete sets of rules, Millikan holds that accumulated facts about past linguistic performances are determiners of contemporary semantic and syntactic facts.
As the author of some of the most seductively challenging linguistic performances of our time, he makes it exceedingly difficult to answer the simplest questions about his work, such as the question asked a few months ago by my young daughter, who noticed The Tunnel among the books in my study and said, "What's that about?"
IRC linguistic performances (whether they be gender or other forms of linguistic performances) are often so stereotypic they border on parody.