Competence

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Related to Linguistic competence: Linguistic performance, Communicative competence

Competence

Sufficient ability or fitness for one's needs. The necessary abilities to be qualified to achieve a certain goal or complete a project.

Competence

The ability to complete a project, make a product, or otherwise do what is required. Both individuals and companies have competence. For example, an engineer would not likely find a job as a nurse because it is outside his competence, that is, his ability to do the required work. Likewise, a dental office is unlikely to be hired to design a skyscraper.
References in periodicals archive ?
What are students' perceptions of the integration of the assessment of oral linguistic competence in the Bs1 course with regard to its impact on their oral language production?
Interactive writing, as well as other forms of dialogic pedagogy, has the potential to promote greater linguistic competence with the language of instruction, whether English or ASL, among d/hh students.
To provide effective mental health services to diverse populations in primary care settings, it is critical to adopt best practices in both integrated healthcare (IHC) and cultural and linguistic competence (CLC).
(6) As we know, bilingual students in many countries do not receive instruction in their L1, which has negative consequences for their general linguistic competence. Probably, the specificity of the language contact situation in Catalonia favors more positive results, partly due to a more pluralistic approach to bilingual educational policy.
Communicative competence in this narrower sense has the following components: linguistic competences, sociolinguistic competences, and pragmatic competences" (p.
* Number of results above the average level of the group in English language sector (linguistic competence English language sector)
This in itself is thrilling and harks back to Noam Chomsky's idea of linguistic competence. Kahneman and Tversky's research is grounded in the detailed study of their subjects' responses and reveals the mind's operations and possibly innate dispositions, including their neurological basis.
Both the resource persons came forward with unique and striking ideas to enable the participants to construct tests for the assessment of linguistic competence (grammar and vocabulary) and language skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) and to use alternative forms of assessment in their classroom, in addition to traditional achievement tests.
The exam targeting around 60,000 high school students in total aims to check their linguistic competence before the introduction of new English education guidelines for high schools from the next academic year, in which students will be required to speak in English during class hours in principle.
ERIC Descriptors: Language Acquisition; Child Development; Epistemology; Linguistic Theory; Language Processing; Behaviorism; Learning Theories; Developmental Psychology; Child Psychology; Piagetian Theory; Linguistic Competence; Language Research; Learning Processes
KEY WORDS: philosophy of linguistics, linguistic competence, personal/subpersonal distinction, doxastic/subdoxastic distinction, propositional attitudes
Starting with 1971 the latter rejects the restrictive notion of linguistic competence as explained by Chomsky on the grounds that it does not account for the cultural interpretation of meanings, nor for their negotiation.

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