Wave

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Wave

A short-term movement that goes against the general trend. For example, if the DJIA rallies on a given trading day but overall is in the midst of a prolonged bear market, the rally is called a wave against the bearish tide.
References in periodicals archive ?
The experiment confirmed that the device was able to transform the light waves in the range of frequencies that would have been absorbed by the optical filter, then completely reverse the process as the light wave exited the filter, making it look as though the laser pulse had propagated through a non-absorbing medium.
Due to the nature of this interaction, engineers and scientists have long known that in order to reverse the process and make an object "invisible," the color of light waves hitting the object has to be manipulated.
When viewing an object, what you are really seeing is the way in which it modifies the energy of the light waves that interact with it.
After a brief calibration, the mirror sent light waves that passed back through the chicken again and combined to re-create the "5."
MDF of a continuous plane light wave propagating in vacuum at speed c is given by ([W.sub.0]c)/c = [W.sub.0][J/[m.sup.3]] where [W.sub.0] = [[epsilon].sub.0][E.sup.2.sub.0]/2 is the energy density of the light wave and E is the amplitude of the strength of the alternate electrical field of the light wave.
The researchers' goal was to design a structure that would predictably transform an incoming light wave's shape.
The light wave can make many trips around the ring before it is absorbed, but only frequencies of light that fit perfectly into the circumference of the ring can do so.
As a light wave travels from one medium, such as air, into another, such as water, it follows Snell's law: When light refracts, it does so on the other side of an imagined line perpendicular to the water's surface.
A light wave with a--amplitude creates a--reflected color.
In it, the budding theorist imagines what it would be like to ride on a light wave.
Just as motion changes the pitch of a sound wave, it can change the length of a light wave. Light emitted by an object moving away from Earth appears to have its wavelengths stretched, or lengthened, as indicated by its spectrum.
That means that the electric and magnetic fields that make up a light wave vibrate only in particular directions.