Whole-Life Cost

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Whole-Life Cost

The total amount a company spends on an asset over its entire usable life. Examples of whole-life costs include planning, research, purchase price, and maintenance. Companies estimate the whole-life cost prior to purchasing a new asset to determine whether or not it will be cost effective. It is also called the life cycle cost.
References in periodicals archive ?
The software can be effectively used to help water and wastewater utilities in maintaining the desired level of service at the lowest life cycle cost.
The life cycle cost of gas turbines, whether for use on land, at sea or in the air, has a direct impact on the profitability of the power plant's operation.
The life cycle cost method is an important tool for textile mills, but cannot eliminate the risks of an entrepreneur.
Life cycle cost calculations we can exploit to evaluation of cost effectiveness spend in pre-production stage too.
I would like to comment on the importance of tracking metrics associated with two aspects of total life cycle costs of an acquisition system: (1) MCTR (Mean Cost to Repair)--total cost to implement all corrective and routine maintenance actions over a specified number of missions/total number of corrective and routine maintenance actions during specified number of missions; and (2) MCTO (Mean Cost to Operate)--total cost to operate system during a specified number of missions/total number of missions
government, in collaboration with the prime contractor, can safely recommend this support concept to the FMS customer to reduce their initial support investment and ensure they acquire in-country maintenance capability on a phased basis as dictated by life cycle cost considerations.
Incorporating a more robust design than previous models, the GDY106 delivers lower life cycle cost due to the improved mean time between overhauls (MTBO).
The Census Bureau (Bureau) estimates that the life cycle cost of the 2010 Census will be from $13.
He has worked on planning studies, conceptual designs, EIS related studies, value engineering and life cycle cost analysis.
The capabilities and technologies contained in EPLRS have evolved over 20 years, but in recent years, use of value engineering (VE) has brought significant improvements and substantial acquisition savings to the EPLRS program, resulting in enhanced system performance, reduced procurement cost, and lower life cycle cost.
ABS is a well recognized for its know-how in applications and cost-effective solutions for pumps, mixers and aerators with a strong focus on low Life Cycle Cost.
They are life cycle cost, present value, residual value, benchmark, evaluation criteria, terms and conditions, order of precedence, lease versus purchase, fixed price options and unbalanced proposal guidance.