Lichas


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Related to Lichas: Alcides

Lichas

An ancient Greek unit of length approximately equivalent to 192.6 millimeters.
References in periodicals archive ?
Regi 1678, 129, lasst ihn vor der Reise auf dem Schiff des Lichas wieder hinzukommen.
(114) Trotzdem enthalt sein Text die Begegnungen mit Lichas und Lycurgus, die Nodot und Dettore zwischen Sat.
"Lichas, Lacedemonien, archonte a Thasos et le livre VIII de Thucydide." CRAI (1983) 376--403.
If Lichas son of Arcesilaos is the proxenos of Argos and Thucydides knew of his death (in 397 B.C.), then Thucydides himself of course lived past 397.
After Lichas' death, the company sees a city, which they do not yet know is Croton: "because we were wandering lost, we did not know what city it was until a certain bailiff ..." (nec quod esset sciebamus errantes, donec a vilico quodam ...
For example, in the episode on Lichas' ship, Encolpius and Giton pretend to look like Ethiopian slaves by blackening their skins, shaving their heads and eyebrows, and putting on wigs to avoid detection (mimicis artibus; 106,1).
Finally, an episode on Lichas' ship approximates the idea of two lovers dying for each other.
After Lichas' ship disintegrates, fishermen on the shore set out to net some booty, but when they see survivors, they come to their rescue: mutaverunt crudelitatem in auxilium (Sat.
Firstly, Encolpius refers to himself as 'exile' (81.3, exul) in a retrospective soliloquy at a moment of disillusion when he has no reason to misrepresent himself to the original reader, who already knows the facts; and secondly, Lichas calls him a scapegoat: 'You thief, what do you have to say for yourself?
The force of Lichas' question above is not that he himself believes that a 'stray salamander' leaped from the sea aboard the ship and burnt off his eyebrows, but that he is mockingly anticipating some far-fetched explanation from Encolpius.
Since we know that Encolpius is a Massaliot, and we may assume that he left the city by sea on the ship of Lichas, a merchant who would have had commercial reasons for going to Massalia, the conclusion is hard to resist that Giton and Tryphaena originate from Massalia, are likewise exiles and were also on that ship.
He also drew attention to the many parodic allusions to Greek myth and Roman legends, which serve the same purpose, especially allusions to the Homeric Odyssey, as for instance in the comic recognition scene where Lichas identifies the bald and shaven Encolpius by his mentula, and the narrator explicitly compares this to Odysseus' more heroic recognition by his scar (Od.