Libertarianism

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Libertarianism

A political philosophy characterized by minimalist governance. Libertarians favor little or no government intervention in the economy beyond basic protection of property rights. They also strongly oppose perceived infringements of civil liberties. For example, a libertarian would likely oppose the indefinite detention of a suspected subversive without charges.
References in periodicals archive ?
Libertarian theory will morally validate his claim for the rest of the land--provided, as the theory requires, that there is no identifiable victim (or that Green had not himself stolen the land.) But libertarian theory must invalidate his claim to ownership of the northwester portion.
"Toward a Libertarian Theory of Guilt and Punishment for the Crime of Statism." In Property, Freedom and Society: Essays in Honor of Hans-Hermann Hoppe, ed.
Kinsella, Stephan (1997), "A Libertarian Theory of Punishment and Rights," Loyola of Los Angeles Law Review 30: 607-45.
Although libertarian theory could be used to support the rights of Medicare beneficiaries to health care coverage of which pharmaceuticals is a part, the theory would not support redistribution.
For example, in his discussion of Nozick on rights, Feser remarks that "the notion that all genuine rights are property rights is a very important one in libertarian theory" (p.
However, the duration of any individual's control over an appropriated resource must be neither too short nor too long if property rights are to play their role in libertarian theory.
In fact, when libertarian theory, in the days of emerging capitalism, dominated the thinking and actions of business and government, it was at the expense of enormous suffering throughout the population.
In The Libertarian Idea he examines libertarian theory anew.
Libertarian theory does not directly respond to the challenge of the rising number of uninsured.
(7) Indeed, the origin of Libertarian theory coincides with the Enlightenment era plantation society.
My conclusion was that libertarian theory provides no decisive reason to reject the majority opinion that "at some point in its development (perhaps at the point of consciousness), the fetus enjoys or nearly enjoys FMS, and that good cause must then exist to justify an abortion" (Friedman 2015: 159; emphasis in original).
The generally libertarian character of the Brennan symposium will be obvious to anyone familiar with libertarian theory, and it dovetails with some important work on libertarianism in the rest of the issue.
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