Libertarian


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Libertarian

A person who believes government policies should be limited to preventing harm, rather than promoting goodness. Libertarians holds that people have the right to do whatever they wish provided that they do not prevent others from doing whatever they want. For example, a libertarian would oppose slavery (because it violates the rights of the slave) but would also oppose minimum wages (because they violate the employer's right to pay whatever the employee will take).
References in periodicals archive ?
The Libertarians will hold a $99-per-person summer get-together and rally at Oppenheimer in Wheatfield on Wednesday, July 31, at Shelter 22.
The 1969 YAF national convention ended with the expulsion of some libertarian and anarchist members--but by then, many of the more radical students had already connected with each other.
Libertarians and other third-party candidates have never won state elections in Texas and rarely make a meaningful difference in election results, with one big exception: As spoilers.
He said Libertarians are seeing growth in the more sparsely populated areas that are still close to metros, a description that fits each of the two districts with four candidates in the general.
In the book's introduction, he and Schlueter note that a "sound public philosophy must take people as they are and not as we want or imagine them to be." Wenzel contends that his libertarianism is not Utopian because it recognizes that human beings are fallible and admits that there has never been a perfectly libertarian society.
(7) Indeed, the origin of Libertarian theory coincides with the Enlightenment era plantation society.
Asked about global warming, he put a "libertarian" spin on Hillary's vow to drive the coal miners into the unemployment line by claiming coal is simply being run out of business by the free market.
In our analysis, Wenzel is herein taking on the stance of a thick libertarian. From the perspective of libertarian thinism, just because "as humans, we can empathize with the horror of unjustified pain" it would not "be appropriate to ban the torture/cruel treatment of animals." There are many things that bring "horror" to us: horror movies, the loss of a game of our favorite sports team--when we have bet more money on them than we should have, having our marriage proposal turned down, etc.
In general, though, non-white conservatives possess a political refugee status on campus and the libertarian group fills a niche role in this regard: YAL and SFL are havens for conservatives still uncomfortable with their place in the broader GOP hierarchy.
Justice Stephen Field dissented and unwittingly became the patron saint of the libertarian legal movement.
But why is a libertarian intellectual asserting these as the alternatives from which to choose?

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