Liberalism


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Related to Liberalism: Marxism, conservatism

Liberalism

The philosophy that one ought to be able to do what one would like provided it does not hurt another person. It was conceived in the 19th century primarily as an economic and social philosophy espousing religious liberty, the free market, and capitalism. In the 20th century, it became associated with the left, especially in the United States, due to a concern for social justice. As a result, a liberal tends to favor regulation of private enterprise. However, adherents to what is sometimes called "19th-century liberalism" or "European liberalism" are presumably more amenable to the free market.
References in periodicals archive ?
(27) Konstantin Shneider, "Was There an 'Early Russian Liberalism'?
While a large body of historical research has discussed the role of liberalism from the foundation of the Argentinean state until the first decades of the twentieth century, the ideology has not received similar attention during the 1930-1955 timeframe.
The key difference between the liberalism criticised by Polanyi and neo-liberalism, as I see it, is that the latter is more concerned with the competitive market ethos than with markets themselves.
And yet, due to the rich, diverse, complex and even contradictory range of policies associated with liberalism, which present seemingly insurmountable challenges for theorization, there is no coherent overall account of liberalism.
Punitive liberalism preached the necessity of national repentance for a history of crimes and misdeeds that had produced a present so poisonous that it murdered a president.
In his attempt to define "liberalism" Ryan gives a short list of liberals that includes John Locke, Adam Smith, Montesquieu, Thomas Jefferson, John Stuart Mill, Lord Acton, T.
Central to liberalism's predicament concerning claims of culture is the dilemma of remaining steadfast to its "thick" liberal principles (and thereby alienating various groups and cultures) or compromising its substance to make itself available to a wide range of diverse communities.
This book shows that liberalism became the major ideological reference for anti-Peronist politicians and intellectuals.
In a late chapter entitled 'The Poverty of Political Liberalism', Taylor contends that the idea that there can be overlapping consensus amongst reasonable comprehensive doctrines about justice as fairness is completely untenable.
Near the end of Liberalism the author also suggests that his goal has been to grapple with the legacy of an internationally (indeed, globally) important political movement.
Modern American liberalism is capacious, embodying a vast panoply of political beliefs and policy prescriptions.
Her use of Oaxaca, a relatively well-studied case (though still lacking for the immediate post-independence period), and Yucatan, where the focus in the past has almost exclusively been on the devastation of the Caste Wars (1847-1901), highlights the ways in which differing local understandings and practices of liberalism impacted important political outcomes.