Liberalism


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Related to Liberalism: Marxism, conservatism

Liberalism

The philosophy that one ought to be able to do what one would like provided it does not hurt another person. It was conceived in the 19th century primarily as an economic and social philosophy espousing religious liberty, the free market, and capitalism. In the 20th century, it became associated with the left, especially in the United States, due to a concern for social justice. As a result, a liberal tends to favor regulation of private enterprise. However, adherents to what is sometimes called "19th-century liberalism" or "European liberalism" are presumably more amenable to the free market.
References in periodicals archive ?
Let me define liberalism according to our society: When you stop backbiting, criticism and start concentrating on your own life and its issues then you are considered liberal.
A second point that may puzzle some readers is the implicit assertion of the title: Deneen did not name the book, "Has Liberalism Failed?
To the contrary, they are signs that liberalism is more essential than ever.
He says economic liberalism and social liberalism are part of the same thing, you can't have one without the other.
Liberalism took shape in the European Enlightenment.
While a large body of historical research has discussed the role of liberalism from the foundation of the Argentinean state until the first decades of the twentieth century, the ideology has not received similar attention during the 1930-1955 timeframe.
The key difference between the liberalism criticised by Polanyi and neo-liberalism, as I see it, is that the latter is more concerned with the competitive market ethos than with markets themselves.
Jahn, a critical theorist and professor at the University of Sussex, rightly points out that liberal theories have played a much more fundamental role in and for the discipline of International Relations than is often recognized--after all, with very rare exceptions, general accounts of liberalism are mostly restricted to textbooks.
The thirty-three essays in The Making of Modern Liberalism span more than forty years of scholarly work and feature a wide selection of Ryan's conceptual and historical efforts.
Because the 20th century's key political and policy developments were not inevitable, Siegel invites us to revisit them--most importantly, how a seminal group of thinkers during the 1920s set liberalism along the path it has followed ever since, a path rooted in fear and loathing of common opinion and disparagement of business.
Their recasting of the tragedy in order to validate their curdled conception of the nation marked a ruinous turn for liberalism, beginning its decline from political dominance.
He finds that they do not agree on many positions associated with liberalism, for example the boundaries of toleration, the legitimacy of the welfare state, and the virtues of democracy.