Liberalism

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Related to Liberal theory: Liberal Theory of State, Marxist Theory

Liberalism

The philosophy that one ought to be able to do what one would like provided it does not hurt another person. It was conceived in the 19th century primarily as an economic and social philosophy espousing religious liberty, the free market, and capitalism. In the 20th century, it became associated with the left, especially in the United States, due to a concern for social justice. As a result, a liberal tends to favor regulation of private enterprise. However, adherents to what is sometimes called "19th-century liberalism" or "European liberalism" are presumably more amenable to the free market.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is concluded that the longstanding and well known criticism, by legal positivists operating in the liberal tradition, that international law is not law in the true sense of the term, seems valid only because it is measured by the standards of liberal theory (O'Brien, 2002).
The main thesis of realistic and liberal theory of international relations which explain the intervention of the Russian Federation in Crimea are several.
In summary, Kymlicka shows that individual freedom is closely connected with cultural membership, and thus, a liberal theory must incorporate the issue of cultural membership into its basic principles.
Demands of cultures and claims of global justice, instead of posing an irreconcilable dilemma within liberalism, should be viewed as a healthy challenge for a liberal theory of justice.
Thomas Gutmann, Some Preliminary Remarks on a Liberal Theory of Contract, 76 LAW & CONTEMP.
That is exactly what Eichner does in the first two chapters of The Supportive State, in which she develops a revised liberal theory of politics that corrects liberalism's long-standing neglect of families.
1) See WILL KYMLICKA, MULTICULTURAL CITIZENSHIP: A LIBERAL THEORY OF MINORITY RIGHTS 80-93 (1995).
However, although the individual rights vest him with the ability to pursue the law of his choice, the emphasis on the rights of the individual leads me to classify vestedness as a liberal theory.
oversimplifying, classical liberal theory posits that individuals are
I stress this point because it is central to the contrast between Miller's liberal theory and the ideas of two of his interlocutors: Richard Rorty and Charles Taylor.
2) Classical liberal theory cannot construct rights discourse effectively due to individualism, subjectivism, and discourse theory.
36) By Kymlicka's view, "what distinguishes a liberal theory of minority rights is .