Dokdo

(redirected from Liancourt Rocks)
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Dokdo

A subdivision of the kori, the currency of Kutch while it was part of British India. A dokdo was worth 1/24 of one kori. Its plural was dokda.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the move garnered criticism from South Korea, which demanded Japan to let go of the territorial claims over the Liancourt Rocks.
amp;nbsp;South Korea has police presence on the Liancourt Rocks since its liberation from Japan in 1945.
The territorial dispute over the Liancourt Rocks was one of the main stumbling blocks in Japan-South Korea normalisation negotiations that started in 1951.
And a long-planned step forward in cooperation between South Korea and Japan was torpedoed when the South Korean prime minister visited the barren island that Korea calls Dokdo, Japan calls Takeshima, and the United States calls the Liancourt Rocks.
According to the Wall Street Journal, the game's title comes from the Japanese name for the islands, which are known as the Dokdo in South Korea and the Liancourt Rocks to countries not part of the dispute.
The renewed row over sex slaves comes as tensions grow between the two countries over the Liancourt Rocks, an archipelago off the Japanese coast.
The islands, called the Dokdo Islands in Korean, the Takeshima Islands in Japanese and the Liancourt Rocks in English, have been part of a territorial dispute between South Korea and Japan since Korea gained its independence from Japan after World War II.
The board's website previously said the Liancourt Rocks, another name for the islets, were under South Korea's control, but it late last month named them an area of ''undesignated sovereignty.
The board's website previously said the Liancourt Rocks, another name for the islets known as Dokdo in South Korea and as Takeshima in Japan, were under South Korea's control, but it now names them an area of ''undesignated sovereignty.
The board's website previously said the Liancourt Rocks, another name for the islets known as Dokdo in South Korea and Takeshima in Japan, were under South Korea's control, but it now names them an area of ''undesignated sovereignty.
South Korean Ambassador Lee Tae Sik told a press conference in Washington on Sunday that his government plans to work to get the United States to refer to the islets by their Korean name Dokdo rather than as the Liancourt Rocks, a name that was taken from a French whaling ship that first introduced the territory to Europe in the 19th century.
The two islets, known as Takeshima in Japanese, Tokto in Korean and the Liancourt Rocks in English, are administered by South Korea but claimed by Japan.