Dokdo

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Dokdo

A subdivision of the kori, the currency of Kutch while it was part of British India. A dokdo was worth 1/24 of one kori. Its plural was dokda.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Liancourt Rocks islands, also referred to as Dokdo by South Korea and Takeshima by Japan, lie almost equidistant from the two states.
Liancourt Rocks are under the territorial control of South Korea.
Spurred by these developments, Shimane Prefecture embarked on a campaign urging the occupation authorities and the Japanese government to return the Liancourt Rocks, which during the occupation were used by US forces as a bombing range and were outside the so-called 'MacArthur Line', to Shimane Prefecture.
Takeshima Islands Called Dokdo by the Koreans, who occupy the islets, and earlier as the Liancourt Rocks and other local and foreign names, Takeshima consists of two small islands of about 500 feet in altitude.
Plans to deploy a base station on the Dokdo island, part of the Liancourt Rocks, by two South Korean-based mobile operators have been delayed.
The island is known as Takeshima in Japanese, Tokto in Korean and the Liancourt Rocks in English.
The Russian Defence Ministry defended itself saying that two South Korean F-16s approached the Russian bombers near the Liancourt Rocks and conducted unprofessional maneuvers, crossing the course of the Russian aircraft and jeopardizing their safety.
Beyond place naming disputes lie further tensions over the ownership of islets including the Liancourt Rocks. While the rocks may not hold any great value, the physical occupation of small islands helps to consolidate fishing rights and other forms of resource extraction.
Continuing territorial disputes over Dokdo Island, also called Liancourt Rocks by some countries and Takeshima by Japan, seem to have played a role in the discontinuation.
And a long-planned step forward in cooperation between South Korea and Japan was torpedoed when the South Korean prime minister visited the barren island that Korea calls Dokdo, Japan calls Takeshima, and the United States calls the Liancourt Rocks.