LexisNexis

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LexisNexis

A company that provides online research services for legal professionals in the United States and other countries. It provides users with thousands of American court decisions from the 18th century forward, statutes from several countries, as well as articles and other documents. LexisNexis was established in 1977.
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Under the agreement Pressi.com will provide all the press statements it publishes for its clients in real-time to Lexis-Nexis' online databank.
"Lexis-Nexis' coverage of the NewYork business, political, and leisure scene is second to none with publications like The New York Observer, The New York Times, New York Post, Newsday, and The New Yorker," said Bill Pardue, CEO and president of corporate and federal markets for Lexis-Nexis.
For the convenience of both the school and the user, Lexis-Nexis products will be integrated into the Jenzabar infrastructure.
"With CorporateAffiliations.com, users can create customized corporate linkage reports based on 29 different search criteria to deliver the information they need in seconds," said Tom Pierson, director of Business Development for Lexis-Nexis Corporate and Federal Markets.
"Lexis-Nexis has been providing quality legal resources to the Florida legal community for many years," Tartaglia said, adding the collaborative relationship between The Florida Bar and Lexis-Nexis dates back to 1988.
LEXIS-NEXIS is an online publisher based in Dayton, Ohio.
The bulk of that investment--90 percent-is earmarked for Internet projects, including Lexis-Nexis.
(RDS) and LEXIS-NEXIS have announced that three additional RDS business files have been added to the LEXIS-NEXIS services.
DataMiner is a powerful utility that allows CPAs, Attorneys, other professionals, and researchers to get the most out of their Lexis-Nexis or other public records on-line service, expand their marketing reach, and improve their productivity.
Is the firm tied into legal databases such as Lexis-Nexis, and does it have its own library?
Tucker argues that the use of corporate sponsored databases such as Lexis-Nexis and Westlaw are promoting the political homogenization of arguments available to debaters.
Online and online-print combination versions of the Report-accessible through Lexis-Nexis at www.lexis.com and featuring e-mail delivery, direct links to court documents and cases cited, and breaking news e-mail updates-are also available.