caveat emptor

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Related to Let the buyer beware: Cave emptor, Caveat venditor

Caveat Emptor

Latin for "let the buyer beware." It is used in many transactions to indicate that all sales are final and all due diligence is the sole responsibility of the buyer. The phrase is especially common in real estate.

caveat emptor

‘let the buyer beware’: a situation where a supplier of a good or service is under no legal obligation to inform buyers of any defects or deficiencies in the products supplied. It is thus the responsibility of buyers to determine for themselves whether or not the product is satisfactory. Compare CAVEAT VENDOR.

caveat emptor

a Latin phrase meaning ‘let the buyer beware’. Put simply, this means that the supplier has no legal obligation to inform buyers about any defects in his goods or services. The onus is on the buyer to determine for himself or herself that the good or service is satisfactory. Compare CAVEAT VENDOR.

caveat emptor

Means “buyer beware.” The legal doctrine followed in some states that sellers of real property are not required to disclose any defects except those inherently dangerous and not easily discoverable by the purchaser.Contrast with seller disclosure states that affirmatively mandate written disclosure of a wide variety of named deficiencies,plus anything else that might be deemed a property defect.

References in periodicals archive ?
The company also produces a growing list of free informational publications, include the quarterly Cycles newsletter and such pamphlets and brochures as Let the Buyer Beware, which explains the ins and outs of laundry contracts and emphasizes the fact that no SDI contract is ever written with a right of first refusal clause; No More Quarters
Thus, follow the age-old tenet: caveat emptor, or let the buyer beware.
The phrase to bear in mind when you enter the auction house is 'caveat emptor': let the buyer beware.
In justifying its actions on this occasion, the council relied on the principle of caveat emptor - let the buyer beware - that is, that as Mr Royal had not inquired about the possibility of adverse ground conditions, the council did not have to tell him.
The principle underlying the acquisition of a company and/or land is largely caveat emptor ( let the buyer beware.

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