Less Than Fair Value


Also found in: Acronyms.

Less Than Fair Value

The deliberate sale of an export so that the export is significantly less expensive than a domestically produced good. A less than fair value sale is not simply less expensive, it is determined to be anti-competitive. Importing countries attempt to counteract less than fair value sales by setting up tariff barriers or countervailing duties. See also: Dumping.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is paying less than fair value for an asset, which protects the capital even if something goes wrong," says Khattar of Edelweiss.
industry is materially injured or threatened'' by imports of seamless refined copper pipes and tubes from China and Mexico that are allegedly sold in the United States at less than fair value.
In the real estate industry, the cost of real estate owned by REITs is in many cases vastly less than fair value of the real estate.
International Trade Commission, alleging that imports of lined paper school supplies from India, Indonesia, and China are being sold at less than fair value, causing material injury to the U.
Department of Commerce's determination that the imported boards are being sold in the United States at less than fair value.
Two factors motivated Oregon processors: falling world prices and a statement by Turkish officials in an earlier trade proceeding that the country was selling hazelnuts in the United States at less than fair value, Owen said.
Giving or selling stock to managers at less than fair value is a dilution of the ownership percentage of other stockholders.
The Department of Commerce has determined honey form hose nations are sold in the United States at less than fair value, and those from Argentina that are also subsidized.
market at less than fair value, and that sales of those computers hurt the only U.
Negative values are assigned to sales deemed made at less than fair value.
The historical comment to the Bulk Sales Act suggests this provision was intended to combat two forms of fraud by a debtor: (1) where a debtor sells its assets to a friend or family member for less than fair value, pays creditors less than the full amount of their claims, and restarts the business under a new name; and (2) where a debtor sells its assets for any price and then absconds with the sale proceeds.
The requirement to depreciate foreclosed assets held for sale would change net income and the asset's carrying amount, which would have been reported if the assets were not depreciated, when depreciated cost is less than fair value minus estimated costs to sell the asset.