Lee Iacocca

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Lee Iacocca

An American automobile executive. He spent his early career at Ford, where he devised marketing strategies. He was made CEO of Chrysler in 1978, when it was on the verge of bankruptcy. He successfully negotiated loan guarantees from the U.S. Congress and introduced better-selling models, saving Chrysler. He retired in 1992.
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I am of the view that staff of Chase Bank would be ready and willing to take a salary cut like they did in the case of Chrysler Motors in the United States of American when Lee Iaccoca took over the management of the company in the early 80s.
Lee Iaccoca has signed on as an advisor with the startling assertion: "In my 40-plus years experience in the automotive industry, Amerityre's car tire technology has the most potential to change the industry as we know it.
Warren Buffett, Lee Iaccoca, or Jack Welch don't have a clue about what's happening on your street.
Pat Robertson, Lee Iaccoca, and Pope John Paul II were all subjected to scrutiny.
It's a shame really, because since Lee Iaccoca introduced the first one nearly 20 years ago, there still isn't a better way to shuttle young children around.
But neither Ford nor GM wanted to invest in new programs that would threaten their long tradition of big-car profitability In 1971, Lee Iaccoca sent Hal Sperlich to Europe to learn about front-wheel-drive cars.
Geneen, Lee Iaccoca, Tom Peters, Shigeo Shingo, Philip Crosby, Sam Walton, Seiichi Nakajima, W.
In the study of business leaders, it is the work of such charismatics as Lee Iaccoca or John Sculley that receives most of the attention.
Some corporate leaders like Chrysler's Lee Iaccoca see the seriousness of the educational system's problems and how they will deter US competitiveness; these leaders are speaking out and putting money and resources behind their words.
Chrysler's Lee Iaccoca, with his keen eye for determining what people want (as witnessed by the success of the Ford Mustang of the 1960s and the "tall car versus short truck" minivan in the 1980s), is credited with reintroducing the convertible to American drivers.