Layup

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Layup

Used in the context of general equities. Easily executed trade or order. See: Lead pipe.

Layup

Informal; an order to a broker that can be executed easily. Layups are made on highly liquid securities at a reasonable price. A layup is also called a lead pipe.
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"It has been a bit of a challenge to get them to change lead pipes."
The lead pipe replacement program was enacted at the advice of City Manager Rick Kozal in response to directives from the Illinois Department of Public Health and possible legislation coming from Springfield regarding lead pipes.
(35) John Wisely and Todd Spangler, Where are the lead pipes? In many cities, we just don't know, Detroit Free Press, February 28, 2016, available at http://www.freep.com/story/news/ Iocal/michigan/flint-water-crisis/2016/02/27/ lead-water-lines-lurk-unknown-many-cities/ 80551724/.
The company is in the process of replacing hundreds of lead pipes with modern plastic ones to ensure it continues to exceed water quality regulations.
Lead pipes have traditionally been used because they have a long life span and they resist pinhole leaks, which are a common problem with underground pipes.
Flint's new mayor--Karen Weaver, elected in December-has called for quickly removing lead pipes. But replacing them could take years and cost billions of dollars.
Unfortunately, as the historian Werner Troesken has observed, cities with soft water overwhelmingly chose lead pipes over iron because iron pipes corrode in soft water.
Alerted about the incident, two other Alpha Sigma members identified as Ernesto Luis Pangalangan and Mario Andrefanio Santos II went to the area an hour later but were also attacked by masked men wielding lead pipes who fled in a silver Peugeot van.
Preliminary data show that strategies of replacing only the publicly owned portion of lead pipes (known as partial mitigation) do not decrease (and might increase) blood lead levels.
More recently, motivated by elevated levels of drinking water in Greenville and Durham, North Carolina, which appear to be related to water treatment changes that increased the ratio of chloride to sulfate in drinking water, Edwards and Triantafyllidou have been conducting experiments that evaluate galvanic corrosion by measuring electrical current between joined copper and lead pipes and also by measuring release of dissolved and particulate lead.