layoff

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Lay Off

To terminate employees because the company is not making sufficient profits to pay them or to sustainably keep them on staff. While a lay off could affect one employee, the term usually refers to a group of employees that are let go because of budget cuts, restructuring, or other, similar situations. If and when the company returns to its previous profitability, it may hire back those employees who were laid off. Often, the company offers a severance or other final compensation to laid off employees.

layoff

The allocation of unsold shares to syndicate members from a new issue rights offering by the managing underwriter.
References in periodicals archive ?
But it did have some encouraging news: While the average CEO eliminated 1,200 jobs and received $600,000 in additional compensation the next year, an "underpaid" CEO who chooses to engage in layoffs did not necessarily get a raise just for cutting head count.
Workers on temporary layoffs constitute a significantly smaller share of the labor force than those on permanent layoffs (Figure 1).
The prospective of a pay cut for everyone rather than the ax of layoffs might seem like an appealing prospect and a good choice to some.
The December figure was 6 percent below a year earlier, when planned layoffs totaled about 32,600, and it marked the third consecutive month that announced workforce reductions fell from the previous year.
The considered actions are globally expected to affect a maximum of 600 people through redundancies, temporary layoffs and early retirement.
McDonald said the layoffs represent about 6 percent of the company's 3,500 workers in Arkansas.
Last August, GM and the union reached a deal to delay the layoffs until January 26.
Those layoffs in Fiat will produce further layoffs-the ripple effect will be much bigger on the region [and] car parts suppliers.
With lots of layoffs at the Post, "the handwriting was on the wall," she said.
Frank Gillett, an analyst at Forrester, said he didn't think that the reorganization would result in 25,000 layoffs.
Education is a labor-intensive industry, and because most districts devote well over half of all spending to teacher compensation, budget cuts have already led to the most substantial teacher layoffs in recent memory.
The hope is that the source of the confusion will be discovered soon and the layoffs will be canceled before they go into effect, he said.