Succession

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Succession

The rules of or process by which a person goes about filling a role previously held by another person. In estates, succession determines who owns the property of the decedent, with everything going to the next of kin in the absence of a will. In business, succession is the process by which one employee, especially a major executive like the CEO, is replaced by another person. In determining succession, a board of directors ought to exercise caution to ensure that an executive is not only competent, but also does not bring any conflicts of interest to the company.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the Sovereign of the United Kingdom were to abdicate in favour of the heir apparent and this were done by instrument without ministerial advice, then there would be a demise of the Crown and the laws of succession as part of the law of each of the Realms would apply so that the heir apparent became Sovereign in each Realm without the need for separate action in each Realm.
While it gives moral support to the Parliament of the United Kingdom, its assent is not legally necessary for the British Parliament to change the laws of succession for the United Kingdom, and its assent to a British act does not actually change the laws of succession for Canada.
really cares if the laws of succession have been changed so first-born female heirs can inherit the throne?
If such a law had the effect of denying any children access to the throne, the laws of succession would be altered, and according to the second paragraph of the preamble to the Statute of Westminster, the assent of the Canadian parliament and the parliaments of the Commonwealth that recognize Queen Elizabeth II as their head of state would be required.
If an act of parliament is needed, it is unlikely to be unopposed, with MPs raising the future of the monarchy, laws of succession and disestablishment of the Church of England.
A THE laws of succession do allow for circumstances where certain people can in effect inherit someone else's tenancy.
Even though Richard had been a terrible king, lived the profligate life with questionable friends, imposed confiscatory taxes on the commoners and nobles alike, Henry Bolingbroke was nor, according to England's laws of succession, the rightful heir to the throne.