Succession

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Succession

The rules of or process by which a person goes about filling a role previously held by another person. In estates, succession determines who owns the property of the decedent, with everything going to the next of kin in the absence of a will. In business, succession is the process by which one employee, especially a major executive like the CEO, is replaced by another person. In determining succession, a board of directors ought to exercise caution to ensure that an executive is not only competent, but also does not bring any conflicts of interest to the company.
References in periodicals archive ?
Notwithstanding that this provision remains in place, Australia does not consider that the laws of succession for the Australian Crown are set by the British Parliament or that a convention of symmetry exists between the Australian and British monarchs.
4) because of the first three, changes to the laws of succession are determined solely by United Kingdom legislation.
H Baxter Accrington The BIG Issue THE Queen and Commonwealth leaders have voted to change the 300-year-old laws of succession so first-born female heirs can inherit the throne.
Report of 1930, the alteration of the laws of succession in 1936-37 and that of the royal style and titles in 1947 and 1952 suggest that the second paragraph of the preamble to the Statute should be considered a constitutional convention rather than a rule of strict law.
Even though Richard had been a terrible king, lived the profligate life with questionable friends, imposed confiscatory taxes on the commoners and nobles alike, Henry Bolingbroke was nor, according to England's laws of succession, the rightful heir to the throne.
Central European laws of succession have their origins in ancient German times when decedents had only bodily heirs--their own children--and nullum testamentum.
In these countries, social rights, pension rights, alimony obligation, and laws of succession and possession are similar between same-sex couples who register their partnerships and opposite-sex couples who marry.