Moore's Law

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Moore's Law

In technology, a theory stating that the number of transistors on an integrated circuit doubles every 18 months. Moore's Law was first articulated by George Moore, who co-founded Intel, in 1965. His original statement was that the doubling occurred every 12 months, but the pace has not been that fast for some time. Nevertheless, Moore's Law is expected to apply until at least 2017, when physical limitation is predicted to force the rate of development to slow.
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References in classic literature ?
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The Senators and Representatives shall receive a Compensation for their Services, to be ascertained by Law, and paid out of the Treasury of the United States.
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