Law of Blood


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Law of Blood

A citizenship law stating that all or nearly all persons born to citizens of a given state are themselves citizen of that state, regardless of where they were born. For example, one with a parent who has been a U.S. citizen for one year is a citizen of the U.S., regardless of where one was born. Some countries (including the United States) also follow the law of the soil in addition to the law of blood.
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Reid argues that evidence does not exist that Ward or other war women could decide the fate of captives, only that they could use their powers of persuasion to convince others to spare lives (Law of Blood, 187-88).
1 (March 1918): 27; Timberlake, Memoirs, 94; Reid, A Law of Blood, 69.
(38) Reid, Law of Blood, 153-61; Gleach, Powhatan's World, 51-52.
A Law of Blood is replete with forward-looking ideas, many of which are just now beginning to come under greater scrutiny in the historical community.
A Law of Blood is certain to remain an exemplary and frequently-referenced source for all students of Cherokee history and Native American history.
When Dent murdered his wife, according to the document that sketches the events in this case, her relatives "determined to kill the said white man" in accordance with the Cherokee "law of blood." As John Phillip Reid and other scholars have demonstrated, clans and clan vengeance lay at the heart of Cherokee law.
(3.) See John Phillip Reid, A Law of Blood: The Primitive Law of the Cherokee Nation (New York: New York University Press, 1970).

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