Natural Law

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Natural Law

In philosophy, the idea that that right and wrong are fixed, immutable things that human reason can discern. Some natural law theorists base natural law on their ideas about God, but one does not need to believe in God in order to believe in natural law. It forms the philosophical basis for what are now called human rights and for that reason is an important contributor to modern liberalism.
References in periodicals archive ?
But, claims Zvesper, I admit in my own later chapter that the social compact (which Zvesper takes to mean "the need for consensual government") is only one aspect of the founders' political theory, which, he argues, rests on more fundamental concepts like "natural moral law, natural rights, or natural equality and liberty.
Professor Thompson teaches courses in environmental law, water law, natural resources, and property.
Marsilius of Padua is the guiding spirit of an account that attempts a virtuoso combination of contrasting emphases: on the one hand, a thorough authoritarianism that denies both the contractarian foundation of government and the right of popular recourse against it, even at its most perverted; on the other hand, a deeply principled conception of government under the constraints of divine law, natural and revealed, which constitutes the sole ground of its validity, whether in the religious or secular field.
Their arguments are always founded upon things like the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, various international conventions, Canadian jurisprudence derived from statutes or case law, natural justice or common sense.
The image more commonly associated with conscience in church teaching revolves around law, whether revealed law, natural law, or church law.
ROBERT GEORGE, IN DEFENSE OF NATURAL LAW, NATURAL LAW AND INTERNATIONAL ORDER 231 (1999).
Law, natural or human, shall not be ridiculed, nor shall sympathy be created for its violation.
Even if the framers of the Fourteenth Amendment had substantive liberty commitments derived from common law, natural law, and social contract theorizing, why should we be either guided by or constrained by their particular understandings of either the sources or extent of individual liberty?
These four frameworks are revealed law, natural law, utilitarianism, and what might be called Kantian liberalism.