Natural Law

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Natural Law

In philosophy, the idea that that right and wrong are fixed, immutable things that human reason can discern. Some natural law theorists base natural law on their ideas about God, but one does not need to believe in God in order to believe in natural law. It forms the philosophical basis for what are now called human rights and for that reason is an important contributor to modern liberalism.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Boucher gives readers a well- written and erudite discussion of the history of natural law, natural rights, and human rights in a package that new and old scholars in the field can easily access.
Carey ("Natural Law, Natural Rights, and the Declaration of Independence") shows how the prevalence of social-contract theory provided a framework for the natural rights claims the document would advance.
"Today is a victory for the law, natural justice and common sense."
Chapter four covers notions of sovereignty, sources of international law, natural law and positivism, the idea of international society, international actors, enforcement, and critiques of international law.
First Democracy provides readers with an understanding of the barriers preventing contemporary America in the opening decade of the 21st century from being a true democracy, as well as offering readers a provocative presentation of the democratic "sine qua non": freedom from tyranny, social harmony, the rule of law, natural equality, citizen wisdom, reasoning without knowledge, and general education.
There is no law, natural or manmade, to hinder, let alone prevent, the people of this region from starting new businesses.
Few Catholics would classify slavery to be in accordance with divine law, natural law and canon law, which the Vatican did as late as 1866.
They are successful insofar as their citizens, of whatever political persuasion, believe in and work to sustain seven principles: freedom from tyranny (and from being a tyrant), harmony, the rule of law, natural equality, citizen wisdom, reasoning without knowledge and education (in the Greek sense of paideia).
But, claims Zvesper, I admit in my own later chapter that the social compact (which Zvesper takes to mean "the need for consensual government") is only one aspect of the founders' political theory, which, he argues, rests on more fundamental concepts like "natural moral law, natural rights, or natural equality and liberty."
Professor Thompson teaches courses in environmental law, water law, natural resources, and property.
Marsilius of Padua is the guiding spirit of an account that attempts a virtuoso combination of contrasting emphases: on the one hand, a thorough authoritarianism that denies both the contractarian foundation of government and the right of popular recourse against it, even at its most perverted; on the other hand, a deeply principled conception of government under the constraints of divine law, natural and revealed, which constitutes the sole ground of its validity, whether in the religious or secular field.
Their arguments are always founded upon things like the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, various international conventions, Canadian jurisprudence derived from statutes or case law, natural justice or common sense.