Latino

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Latino

A person in the United States with roots, however defined, in a predominately Spanish-speaking country, especially but not necessarily in Latin America. Latino is an ethnicity rather than a race for U.S. Census Bureau purposes. Latinos form one of the largest American minorities.
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cannot reach its goals for international rankings without a tactical plan that includes Latino students.
Latinos should be on boards neither in spite of being Latino (as a barrier) nor just because they are Latino (tokenism), but rather, because they are outstanding directors in their own right and they have Latino-related skill sets that allow them to add extra value to the board, including providing a diversity of perspective.
Earlier, during a discussion on cultural differences, banker Albert Gomez said Latinos need to do more business with one another.
While Chicago has witnessed some progress during the past 25 years, he said discrimination still exists and contributes to persistent residential segregation for African Americans and Latinos.
While there is some literature describing the specific needs of the Latino student population, only a few articles address consultation issues with Latino students and families.
born Latinos, this intimate response to music may harken back to family parties where dancing pulls in even the most Americanized kids to try out steps from their parents'--if not their grandparents'--generation.
A fly on the wall would see that all the Euro-Americans were there "early," and all the Latinos were there "late"--or at a different time.
org), the Sallie Mae Fund has allocated $500,000 in scholarships for Latinos who are the first in their family to pursue a college education.
As an Afro-Cuban, he is one of the original community organizers of both the Latino and African American communities.
Once in the United States, many gay Latinos face new problems, such as racism, alienation, and sexual objectification, says Diaz, adding that 80% of the men he surveyed reported bouts of depression, 44% suffered anxiety, and 17% had thoughts of suicide.
As an answer to the puzzling problems that beset Latinos in the United States today, Suro's analysis is strictly myopic.
For years, many Americans have viewed Latinos as less than white and have enforced this perspective to exclude them from education, employment, political representation, and much else.