Latino


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Latino

A person in the United States with roots, however defined, in a predominately Spanish-speaking country, especially but not necessarily in Latin America. Latino is an ethnicity rather than a race for U.S. Census Bureau purposes. Latinos form one of the largest American minorities.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Latinos should be on boards neither in spite of being Latino (as a barrier) nor just because they are Latino (tokenism), but rather, because they are outstanding directors in their own right and they have Latino-related skill sets that allow them to add extra value to the board, including providing a diversity of perspective.
Sarmiento presented Gibson with a plaque for ``spotlighting'' the Latino community in the movie.
And he said the decisions of blacks and Latinos to live in mostly black and Latino communities may be motivated by persistent perceptions that other communities would not welcome them.
While there is some literature describing the specific needs of the Latino student population, only a few articles address consultation issues with Latino students and families.
Examining the role ethnicity has played in their careers, other Latino dance artists give voice to similar feelings, albeit in the registers of a complex chorus.
It would mean developing styles of prayer and liturgy that might operate in English but in which the religiosity underneath is still predominantly Latino.
College aspiration is high within the Latino community, but financial aid knowledge is the missing link," says Harry Pachon, president of TRPI.
Had it not been for these [characteristics of American color consciousness], would African Americans see and define themselves as a group of people of mixed ancestry, similar to the way many Latinos view themselves?
Diaz says the desire to escape oppression and family pressures often plays a bigger role in gay Latino immigration than any enticements of the mythically "fabulous" gay life here.
At the heart of his analysis is the belief that Latino immigration today is different than any immigration before it, and that the failure of Latinos in the United States to climb out of the ghetto at the rate earlier immigrants did is the result of forces beyond their control.
For example, Suro explores the way Latinos sometimes choose to identify as minorities when it is useful to do so and, at other times, identify with the mainstream and distance themselves from their darker-skinned counterparts.