Landrum-Griffin Act

(redirected from Landrum-Griffin Act of 1959)
Also found in: Legal, Encyclopedia.

Landrum-Griffin Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1959, that required labor unions to conduct secret elections of officers on a regular basis. It also required unions to disclose their financial states to the Department of Labor. It allowed union members to seek recourse from the Labor Department or through the courts in case the Act's provisions were not followed. The Act came about as a response to substantiated allegations that organized crime had infiltrated some American unions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, Joel Rogers attributes the post-Second World War decline in union memberships, not to missed opportunities or to faulty union leadership, but to the Landrum-Griffin Act of 1959, which kept the costs of organizing new membership very high and encouraged union officials to concentrate on maintaining their influence in areas already organized.
Further amendments to the NLRA, contained in the Landrum-Griffin Act of 1959, were intended to regulate the internal conduct of unions and strengthen other provisions of the Act.
A federal law, the Landrum-Griffin Act of 1959, prohibits convicted felons from holding union office for five years following conviction.