Landlord

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Landlord

A property owner who rents property to a tenant.

Landlord

A person who owns real estate and rents it to someone, allowing the renter to live and/or use the real estate in exchange for a fee. The fee is also called rent and is usually paid once per month. In exchange for the rent, the landlord is responsible for the basic upkeep of the property. For example, if the roof collapses, the landlord, rather than the renter, must pay for it. Landlords usually may not deduct the interest they pay on the mortgages of their properties from their taxable incomes, but the rent can provide a steady income with little or no actual work. A female landlord is called a landlady. See also: Passive income.

landlord

The owner of property rented to another. The landlord's interest is called a reversionary interest, while the tenant's interest is possessory.

References in classic literature ?
Then she turned to the landlord, and questioned him as to whether HE would not have fought a duel, if challenged.
'It's a stew of tripe,' said the landlord smacking his lips, 'and cow-heel,' smacking them again, 'and bacon,' smacking them once more, 'and steak,' smacking them for the fourth time, 'and peas, cauliflowers, new potatoes, and sparrow-grass, all working up together in one delicious gravy.' Having come to the climax, he smacked his lips a great many times, and taking a long hearty sniff of the fragrance that was hovering about, put on the cover again with the air of one whose toils on earth were over.
'Did you say brandy-and-water, Sir?' said the landlord, venturing a hint.
Do you pretend to say, landlord, that this harpooneer is actually engaged this blessed Saturday night, or rather Sunday morning, in peddling his head around this town?
"Come, come," said the landlord, who felt that paying people for their absence was a principle dangerous to society; "a joke's a joke.
But these freaks of his guest were not much to the liking of the landlord, so he determined to cut matters short and confer upon him at once the unlucky order of knighthood before any further misadventure could occur; so, going up to him, he apologised for the rudeness which, without his knowledge, had been offered to him by these low people, who, however, had been well punished for their audacity.
Jones contented himself however with a negative punishment, and walked off with his new comrades, leaving the guide to the poor revenge of cursing and reviling him; in which latter the landlord joined, saying, "Ay, ay, he is a pure one, I warrant you.
"Say so!" replied the landlord. "He han't no call to say so."
There was no need for me to draw Rouletabille's attention; he had already left our omelette and had joined the landlord at the window.
Having already given up their own room to their lodgers, the landlord and landlady had no other place to sleep in than the kitchen.
'I thought you gave an order,' said the landlord, after a pause of two or three minutes for consideration.
"Ho, landlord!" cried he, "whither hath that knave gone that was with me but now?"