land grant

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land grant

A grant of public lands by the government, usually for roads, railroads, or agricultural colleges.

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The Second Morrill Act of 1890 provided additional funding to historically white land-grant colleges established by the 1862 land-grant legislation, but with one caveat: money would not be distributed to states that considered race in admissions and had not established a separate college for colored students.
This Act required Southern states to establish a second land-grant college to serve the needs of black citizens in the training of agriculture and mechanical arts (Comer et al., 2006).
The third critical piece of the land-grant system -- the Agricultural Extension Service (now Cooperative Extension) -- was created with the passage of the Smith-Lever Act in 1914.
Here we sit, number forty-nine in land-grant holdings out of fifty states, fifty-five years after Egan's veto.
The results of this study indicate that there is a statistically significant, weak association between the initiation of organizational portfolio management and the institutional characteristics of Type, Size, Land-Grant Status, and Carnegie Class, as illustrated in figure 2.
1890 and 1862 Differences: Need scores for 1890 and 1862 land-grant alumni were highly correlated (r =.91).
President Woodrow Wilson signed the Smith-Lever Act on May 8, 1914, and soon, each state's land-grant university was organizing Cooperative Extension, or formalizing existing efforts.
Will extension and others in the land-grant system provide the necessary leadership for this to happen?
Twenty-five years later, in 1887, the federal Hatch Act provided additional funding for agricultural research by land-grant colleges.
Jose Cruz, the vice president tor higher education, policy and practice at the Education Trust, a non-profit organization that pushes high academic achievement and seeks to narrow opportunity and achievement gaps--especially among minority students from pre-kindergarten to college--says that most of the nation's land-grant institutions have neglected their mission to educate diverse populations in favor of recruiting high-achieving students from relatively wealthy families who can help the schools climb in national rankings.
In later years, the towns of East Brookfield, North Brookfield, West Brookfield, New Braintree and Warren were carved out of the land-grant area.
Added to the land-grant mission of our university is the fact that we live and work in a state with a strong populist heritage that includes a dim view of elites and elitism.
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