Land Reform

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Land Reform

Any direct action by a government to change who owns land in a country. For example, a government may confiscate property held by large, foreign corporations and distribute it among poor and small farmers. Land reform is highly controversial whenever it is practiced.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Department of Rural Development and Land Reform of South Africa released results of a Land Audit to establish land ownership patterns.
During the hearing, the Department of Agrarian Reform (DAR) admitted it was the President alone who decided to put Boracay under the government's land reform program after its six-month rehabilitation.
On this the committee chairman queried to members, Zeb Jaffar and Mohammad Farooq has said that there is no need of land reforms and committee should reject the bill.
Critics of the land reform program said it resulted in lower production on farms because the majority of blacks who received the land were untrained to harvest it. Tracy Mutinhiri, a black landowner who farms tobacco, told the(https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/africa/zimbabwe-seized-white-farmers-land-now-some-are-being-invited-back/2015/09/14/456f66d6-45d2-11e5-9f53-d1e3ddfd0cda_story.html) Washington Post  that blacks were now working with white farmers to learn methods about how to get more crops out of the land.
Terrill's book 'reflects a deliberate attempt to remove discussion about indigenous land reform from the ideological sphere and recast it primarily as a technical issue; a technical issue of such complexity that it cannot be adequately comprehended on the basis of mere intuition' (p.291).
The land reforms authority however did not stop collecting the monthly fees from land owners, which sometimes amounted to EGP 2,000 per acre.
" The Congress party is in favour of land reforms. It is our commitment to provide those who are landless with e land so that they can have a roof over their head and lead their lives with dignity.
In most developed countries, conventional land reforms were not required as rising industrial employment and engagement made agricultural work force scanty.
The first attempt at land reforms was undertaken by the military regime of Ayub Khan back in 1959.
Other examples of state-led land reforms having gone astray can be found in contemporary Africa, which the subsequent section will draw further attention to.
I write in response to the article, Namibia: Land reform moves into fast lane (NA, April).
PROTESTERS marched on the Scots Parliament yesterday to highlight their fears over proposed land reforms.
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