Lame Duck


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Lame Duck

An ineffective trader who is in or near bankruptcy due to a series of bad trades, often over a long period of time. A lame duck has suffered heavy losses, not from a bear market or something similar, but simply due to his/her ineptitude. This is a slightly pejorative term that is most common in Europe.
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In the lame duck session, for example, Congress might agree to legislation that would extend all (or most) expired and expiring tax breaks for six months to a year, tied to fundamental tax reform generating some agreed-upon amount in the hundreds of billions of dollars (or more) in overall deficit reduction over the next decade, with the threat of greater deficit reduction if the 113th Congress were to fail to act by then.
As a result, he said, the lame duck session could produce some significant new legislation.
While it seems unlikely that the bill will reach the Senate floor on its own, there is a possibility that the bill--or portions thereof--might be attached to broader appropriations legislation during the lame duck session.
Most recently, academics have responded to perceived abuses by lame duck Presidents by proposing restrictions on the President's powers during the lame duck period.
We want to make sure that Congress doesn't act like a drunk headed to rehab when it comes to earmarks during the lame duck, and take their last big drink before the 'earmark favor factory' closes for good.
Typically, CFC students are 10 to 15 years younger than the Lame Duck attaches and, as a result, in previous years the CFC squad has easily manhandled the Lame Ducks.
But 38 Republican senators - many of whom had earlier signed a letter objecting to consideration of such treaties during Congress' lame duck session - voted to block ratification.
The prospects for any continuation of the ECF in the lame duck session are uncertain.
Ironically, they did much to make sure he was labelled a lame duck Prime Minister.
You might be a lame duck, but you still have the power to help lame turkeys," PETA President Ingrid Newkirk said in a letter to Bush.
The term "lame duck" traces its roots to 18th-century Britain, where it referred to a bankrupt businessman; by the 1830s, lame duck was being used to describe politically down-and-out politicians.
It means two months of nongovernment, although many would argue that the Bush team is already a lame duck administration.