Job Market

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Job Market

The supply and demand for jobs. That is, the job market is the amount of job openings available compared to the workforce capable of taking them. A large number of job openings may indicate lack of demand for jobs (that is, there are not enough skilled workers to fill available positions), while the opposite may indicate few jobs relative to the labor force.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2008) 'Addiction to work: An inelastic wage elasticity of labour supply equals long hours of work, Australian Journal of Labour Economics, 11(2), pp.
"The Long-Term Labor Market Consequences of Graduating from College in a Bad Economy." Labour Economics 17.2 (2010): 303-316.
(2006), "Labour Arrangements and Bargaining Outcomes under Different Market Conditions", The Indian Journal of Labour Economics, 49(1): 121-31
For many years labour economics, with its emphasis on human capital theory, has been the standard fare for those studying personnel or human resource management at either undergraduate or postgraduate levels, or for professional qualifications.
The party's Old Guard, led by the formidable octogenarian Baroness Barbara Castle, have threatened to use the crucial pension debate to take a swipe at Tony Blair and New Labour economics.
As I noted in my earlier review of two previously published volumes on the economic analysis of trade unions, Sapsford (1993), this branch of labour economics was, until a short time ago, seen as something of a Cinderella area.
He secured Master's degree in Labour Economics. Before joining Brooke Bond Pakistan Ltd.
Tenders are invited for Repair of electrical and mechanical installation at national institute of labour economics research and department formerly iamr a 7 narela institute area new delhi sh sitc of smf batteries
18121, June 2012, and Labour Economics, 19(4), 2012, pp.
& Ghosh, Jayati (2007), "Recent Employment Trends in India and China: An Unfortunate Convergence?", Indian Journal of Labour Economics, 50(3), July-September: 383-406.
The theory of firm-specific human capital is a core part of all courses in Labour Economics. Theory predicts that workers build up firm-specific capital in the current job, which they lose if they leave the current job.
Within all the posturing of New Labour economics, great and costly national divisions continue to widen and the manufacturing engine of the economy continues to beg for the oiling of political creativity.