Taft-Hartley Act

(redirected from Labor-Management Relations Act)
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Taft-Hartley Act

Legislation in the United States, enacted in 1947, that amended and rolled back some of the provisions of the National Labor Relations Act. Specifically, the Act provided a list of "unfair labor practices" in which unions and other forms of organized labor could not engage. It prohibited jurisdictional strikes, wherein workers protest transfers to another division or role within the same company, and wildcat strikes, or strikes unauthorized by a union. It also forbade solidarity or other political strikes, and disallowed unions from donating to federal political campaigns. Importantly, the Taft-Hartley Act allowed individual states to pass right-to-work laws. See also: Featherbedding, National Labor Relations Board.
References in periodicals archive ?
On April 11, the House narrowly passed the Preventing Greater Uncertainty in Labor-Management Relations Act by a vote of 219-209, largely along party lines.
Most people I talk to (probably like many of you reading this commentary) seem to quit listening as soon as they hear or read about the National Labor Relations Act, Labor-Management Relations Act or the National Labor Relations Board.
6384) immediately prior to the fall election recess that would amend the Labor-Management Relations Act (i.e., Taft-Hartley Act) and subsequently abolish state right-to-work laws.

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