National Labor Relations Board

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National Labor Relations Board

Also called the NLRB. An agency of the U.S. federal government that monitors union elections and guards against unfair labor practices such as featherbedding or employer discrimination against union members. It also serves as an administrative court for labor disputes. The NLRB consists of five members, appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate to a five-year term. It was established by executive order in 1934.
References in periodicals archive ?
As noted in the United Fresh Produce article, the Employee Free Choice Actamends the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), and agricultural laborers are exempt from that Act.
That boycott ended in 1978, after the UFW won a string of union elections held under California's then-new Agricultural Labor Relations Act.
Based on research and interviews, the book includes cases from the major topics in a basic or advanced course of the subject, including coverage of the National Labor Relations Act, organizing, the scope of concerted activities, the duty of fair representation, economic weapons, collective bargaining, and enforcement of collective bargaining agreements.
Like other agricultural workers in the U.S., they have no official rights to form a union, bargain collectively, or confront employers--rights granted to workers in most other industries under the National Labor Relations Act. And immigrant workers fear deportation if they sign up.
In 1935 the National Labor Relations Act (or Wagner Act, after its sponsor, Democratic New York Sen.
In addition, there do not appear to have been any lawsuits filed challenging the legality of the Act, either on the grounds that it is preempted by the National Labor Relations Act or that it is an unconstitutional intrusion by the City Council into an area of the law within the jurisdiction of the state legislature.
The National Labor Relations Act for the protection of union workers was passed in 1935 and The Electronic Communications Privacy Act was passed in 1986.
He identifies the National Labor Relations Act, which provides for the right of workers to organize and engage in collective bargaining, as a "direct descendant of the great changes wrought by the War of the Rebellion" and speaks of taking "comfort ...
Hayworth has introduced a bill in the House of Representatives titled "Open Competition and Fairness Act of 2003." If enacted, the bill would amend (Section) 8(e) (Enforceability of Contract or Agreement to Boycott Any Other Employer; Exception) of the National Labor Relations Act (29 U.S.C.
The frequent strikes for the purpose of gaining bargaining rights led nearly forty states to individually adopt public sector collective bargaining legislation, thus paralleling the enactment of the National Labor Relations Act in 1935.
The National Labor Relations Act guarantees employers freedom of speech, within limits, and supervisors must be trained in exercising that right through effective communication with employees.
He said previous court decisions have established that federal and state regulators were prohibited from setting their own standards for conduct that is regulated by the National Labor Relations Act.