Weight

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Weight

Weighted

Describing an average in which some values count for more than others. For example, if an index consisting of 10 stocks is weighted for price, this means that the average price of the stocks will move more when the stocks with higher price move. Most indices use weighted averages so "smaller" values do not affect the index inordinately. This helps correct for the fact that averages tend to be affected by extreme values. One of the most common ways of weighting an average is to weight for market capitalization.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Bailey said the savings identified for LBW are just one example from 110 audits covering all of the main agricultural sectors in all regions of the state, that collectively have revealed the potential to reduce power bills by $3 million per year.
According to CSSM classification, <2499 g are LBW newborns and >2500 g are normal birth weight newborns.
Premature delivery, decrease in breast feeding initiation23, shorter for gestation and LBW are significantly associated with maternal depression24.
The Word Health Organization, (WHO) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) in their joint report of 1992 estimated LBW in less developed countries to range between 5 and 33 per cent (WHO 1992b).
After approval from the Ethics Committee of the University of Umm Al-Qura, and after obtaining written informed consent from the mothers, anthropometric measurements as well as biochemical analysis were performed to evaluate the nutritional status of the LBW newborns.
Regarding maternal education, we observed that it was a significant risk factor for LBW in both groups.
Sixty percent of the infants in the LBW group and 8.
The percent of the African American patients with T2D who were of LBW was 11/77 or 14.
Thus, the primary aim of this study was to evaluate the association between maternal LBW and the risk of adverse events in their offspring--specifically LBW, preterm birth, and small for gestational age (SGA) status--as well as to discriminate between confounders and mediating factors of these associations.
Despite substantial improvements in the United States in infant survival and outcomes, a steady increase in the rate of LBW has occurred.
Methods: A group of 500 babies was selected at birth from a tertiary care teaching hospital and categorized into LBW (n=251) with preterm LBW (n=59), term LBW (n=192) and term controls (n=249).